Saudi Human Rights Commission: Kingdom has gone beyond legislation to promote women’s rights

Updated 09 March 2018
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Saudi Human Rights Commission: Kingdom has gone beyond legislation to promote women’s rights

JEDDAH: The Human Rights Commission in Saudi Arabia said in a statement on International Women’s Day that the Kingdom has taken measures and issued legislation to address some of the challenges for women’s rights.
These rights were guaranteed by Islamic law and regulations in the Kingdom and the international conventions to which the Kingdom was party.
The commission said that Saudi Arabia had gone beyond enacting legislation to correct misconceptions that might constitute an obstacle to the empowerment of women, in addition to the measures taken in the field of human rights education.
“Today, Saudi women have a high-status thanks to God and then the directives of King Salman and the crown prince.”
The commission added that Saudi Arabia had given women’s rights a high degree of attention, based on the principles and provisions of Islamic law, which necessitated the preservation of their rights, respect for their dignity, and prohibited any injustice against them.
This was reflected in the legal and institutional frameworks that guarantee the protection of women’s rights, foremost of which is the Basic Law on Governance which ensures that the Kingdom’s rule is based on justice and equality and that the state protects human rights in accordance with Islamic law. The state carried out a series of reforms and reviewed the laws and regulations to support and empower women.
The commission noted that Vision 2030 came with developmental and economic programs and initiatives that enhanced women’s participation in construction and development. Further legislative, judicial and administrative measures have been taken to promote and protect women’s rights.


Sign language and Braille Qur’ans to help pilgrims at Two Holy Mosques

A blind Saudi reads in braille a copy of the Quran, Islam's holy book, inside a mosque on the first day of the holy fasting month of Ramadan in the coastal town of Qatif, 400 kms east of Riyadh, on May 27, 2017. (AFP)
Updated 16 December 2018
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Sign language and Braille Qur’ans to help pilgrims at Two Holy Mosques

  • Copies of the Qur’an in Braille along with other religious booklets are available, as are on-site specialists to help pilgrims during prayer times and guide them through the mosque sites

MAKKAH: Sign language, Braille Qur’ans and electric wheelchairs are some of the new features in Makkah and Madinah to help pilgrims with disabilities to execute the religious rites of Hajj and Umrah.
An official at the General Presidency for the Affairs of the Two Holy Mosques described those with disabilities as “highly motivated people with special powers” and that services had been established to aid them, providing them with ease and comfort and avoiding complications even during peak times.
Ahmed Al-Burqati, who is tasked with helping people at the presidency, told Arab News there were designated entrances to ease access to prayer areas, including the ones on the ground and first floors of the King Fahd expansion at the Grand Mosque in Makkah.
Other provisions include a pen that serves as a Qur’an reader, and help for holding and carrying Qur’ans for people unable to hold them. Copies of the Qur’an in Braille along with other religious booklets are available, as are on-site specialists to help pilgrims during prayer times and guide them through the mosque sites, he added.
Ahmed Badawi, an Egyptian pilgrim performing Umrah, said he was not expecting to find such services awaiting him in the Grand Mosque compound.
Other special services at the holy mosques include: Wheelchairs transported in golf carts to prayer areas; designated entrances; sign language interpreters for those with hearing or speech impairments; canes for the blind and visually impaired; and electric wheelchairs to perform key religious rites such as tawaf.