Fans praise actress Suzan Najm Aldeen’s hijab look during Cairo tour

1 / 2
Suzan Najm Aldeen whilst wearing the hijab. (Instagram)
2 / 2
Updated 10 March 2018
0

Fans praise actress Suzan Najm Aldeen’s hijab look during Cairo tour

CAIRO: Fans commended Syrian actress Suzan Najm Aldeen’s style after she donned a headscarf while touring Old Cairo’s historic religious sites in a recent visit.
The actress’ followers on Instagram commented on her elegance in the hijab and praised the respect she showed for the mosques she was visiting.
Najm Aldeen wrote that she toured Cairo’s Al-Azhar area and the Hussien Mosque.

She also shared a video of herself performing prayers during the tour, while captioning it: “may Allah accept the good deeds from you and us.”
The Syrian actress is preparing for a new film, inspired by her successful role in her latest TV soap “Shouq”, which has earned her wide acclaim across the Arab world.


What We Are Reading Today: The Art of Philosophy by Susanna Berger

Updated 20 February 2019
0

What We Are Reading Today: The Art of Philosophy by Susanna Berger

  • The Art of Philosophy shows that the making and study of visual art functioned as important methods of philosophical thinking and instruction

Delving into the intersections between artistic images and philosophical knowledge in Europe from the late 16th to the early 18th centuries, The Art of Philosophy shows that the making and study of visual art functioned as important methods of philosophical thinking and instruction. From frontispieces of books to monumental prints created by philosophers in collaboration with renowned artists, Susanna Berger examines visual representations of philosophy and overturns prevailing assumptions about the limited function of the visual in European intellectual history.

Rather than merely illustrating already-existing philosophical concepts, visual images generated new knowledge for both Aristotelian thinkers and anti-Aristotelians, such as Descartes and Hobbes. Printmaking and drawing played a decisive role in discoveries that led to a move away from the authority of Aristotle in the 17th century. Berger interprets visual art from printed books, student lecture notebooks, alba amicorum (friendship albums), broadsides, and paintings, and examines the work of such artists as Pietro Testa, Léonard Gaultier, Abraham Bosse, Dürer, and Rembrandt.

In particular, she focuses on the rise and decline of the “plural image,” a genre that was popular among early modern philosophers. Plural images brought multiple images together on the same page, often in order to visualize systems of logic, metaphysics, natural philosophy, or moral philosophy.