Tunisian women march for same inheritance rights as men

Protesters shout slogans during a march, demanding equal inheritance rights for women, in Tunis, Tunisia Mar. 10, 2018. The placard (L) reads “The Constitution is equal for all citizens.” (Reuters)
Updated 10 March 2018
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Tunisian women march for same inheritance rights as men

TUNIS: Tunisian women led a march by more than 1,000 demonstrators Saturday, including men, to demand equal inheritance rights for both sexes in the North African country.
Tunisia's inheritance law is based on Islamic jurisprudence stipulating that men inherit double the amount received by women.
The demonstrators marched to the seat of parliament in the Tunisian capital chanting equal inheritance rights "are a right, not a favour".
Last year, President Beji Caid Essebsi announced plans to set up a commission to examine "individual liberties" and "equality in all domains", including inheritance.
His announcement sparked opposition from Muslim clerics who issued a statement saying the proposals amounted to "a flagrant violation" of Islamic precepts.
Tunisia, which adopted a 1956 Personal Status Code extending several rights to women and abolishing polygamy, is seen as a pioneer on women's emancipation in the Arab world, although tensions often surface between conservatives and reformists.
The 2011 revolution in Tunisia toppled the regime of autocratic president Zine El Abidine Ben Ali and sparked uprisings across the Arab world, where changes to inheritance rights are considered a taboo.
But activists on Saturday stressed the demand for equality among the sexes in Tunisia.
"There must be equality, it is in the constitution," adopted after the 2011 uprising, said Sana Ben Achour, president of the Beity association which supports women.


US-led coalition destroys Daesh site in Syrian mosque

Updated 12 min 2 sec ago
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US-led coalition destroys Daesh site in Syrian mosque

  • Fighters with the Syrian Democratic Forces secured Hajjin after weeks of heavy fighting
  • The town is located in eastern Syria about 30 kilometers from the border with Iraq

WASHINGTON: US-led coalition forces destroyed a Daesh group command center inside a mosque in the Syrian border town of Hajjin on Saturday, the US military said.
The statement comes as Kurdish-led forces mop up the final remnants of Daesh extremists in Hajjin, the largest settlement in what is the last pocket of territory controlled by the extremists.
More than 16 “heavily armed” Daesh fighters were at the “command and control node” at the mosque when it was destroyed by a “precision strike,” a statement from the Combined Joint Task Force read.
The extremists, who were all killed in the strike, were using the mosque to “command attacks against Coalition partners,” it said.
The Daesh group “continues to use protected structures to launch attacks against our Coalition partners with complete disregard for the infrastructure and innocent human lives,” the statement added.
Fighters with the Syrian Democratic Forces secured Hajjin after weeks of heavy fighting on Friday, the Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said.
The town is located in eastern Syria about 30 kilometers (18 miles) from the border with Iraq.
The area is sometimes referred to as the “Hajjin pocket,” the last rump of a once-sprawling “caliphate” the group proclaimed in 2014 over swathes of Syria and Iraq.