New Louis Vuitton handbag seemingly a ‘copy’ of Egyptian company Okhtein's design

Louis Vuitton’s Fall-Winter 2018 collection seemingly has a handbag quite similar in its design to one designed by Egyptian brand Okhtein. (Photo: Scoop Empire)
Updated 11 March 2018
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New Louis Vuitton handbag seemingly a ‘copy’ of Egyptian company Okhtein's design

CAIRO: Louis Vuitton’s Fall-Winter 2018 collection seemingly has a handbag quite similar in its design to one designed by Egyptian brand Okhtein.
The brand, which means “two sisters,” was launched in 2013 by Aya and Mounaz Abdelraouf and has since gone on to reach astronomical heights in its success around the Middle East.
Mounaz was quoted by Egyptian news website Scoop Empire as having thrown some major shade on Instagram, saying “When Louis Vuitton loves your design too much” with the hashtag “Anger Not Flattery!”
The Egyptian designer was comparing the LV bag to her own design.
When Beyoncé debuted a look on Instagram sporting a bag by Okhtein, the Egyptian luxury brand made waves and headlines all across the world.
The popular brand — which is sold in such high-end outlets as Bloomingdales in Dubai and Harvey Nichols in Saudi Arabia — is known for its quirky, cute and ultra-feminine bags and scarves.
Arab News tried to contact Okhtein for a comment, but could not be reached.
 


What We Are Reading Today: Democracy and Dictatorship in Europe by Sheri Berman

Updated 21 April 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: Democracy and Dictatorship in Europe by Sheri Berman

In Democracy and Dictatorship in Europe, Sheri Berman traces the long history of democracy in its cradle, Europe. 

In her study of European political development over more than 200 years, Berman, a professor of political science at Barnard, shows that the story of democracy in Europe is complicated. 

“The ultimate goal, she believes, is liberal democracy, with elections, respect for the rule of law, individual liberties and minority rights. But that is a rare, and hard-won, achievement. A step forward is often followed by a step back,”  said Max Strasser in a review published in The New York Times.

“This may seem a bit obvious to anyone familiar with the broad outlines of European history, but Berman makes the case clearly and convincingly. Moreover, at a moment when hyperventilating over the decline of democracy has grown into a veritable intellectual industry, her long-view approach comes across as appealingly sober,” Strasser added.