Jenna Dewan dazzles in Zuhair Murad outfit at iHeart Radio Music Awards

Jenna Dewan arrives at the iHeart Radio Music Awards on Sunday (AFP)
Updated 13 March 2018
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Jenna Dewan dazzles in Zuhair Murad outfit at iHeart Radio Music Awards

DUBAI: US actress and dancer Jenna Dewan made a stunning appearance on the red carpet at Sunday’s iHeart Radio Music Awards in California. Dewan — a host and mentor on NBC’s “World of Dance” talent show — wore a three-piece outfit from Lebanese designer Zuhair Murad.

Murad’s black-and-red patterned crop top with embellished matching jacket, and black shorts overlaid with a black chiffon high-slitted skirt are part of the designer’s Spring 2018 haute-couture collection, entitled “Indian Summer.”

Dewan, 37, was born in the US to a German-English mother and a Polish-Lebanese father. She got her first major break as a dancer in Janet Jackson’s 2000 video, “Doesn’t Really Matter,” and performed as a backup dancer the following year on Jackson’s “All For You” tour.

In 2006, Dewan starred in the dance-themed romantic movie “Step Up” with Channing Tatum, whom she married in 2009.

Murad was born in Lebanon in 1971. He studied fashion in Paris after finishing high school and has gone on to become one of the Arab world’s most successful designers, worn by Najwa Karam, Taylor Swift, Beyoncé, Shakira, Priyanka Chopra, Jennifer Lopez and many more, including Princess Ameerah Al-Otaibi of Saudi when she attended the wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton.

Murad’s Spring 2018 collection has drawn criticism for the designer’s controversial decision to follow a Native American theme. He explained to “Vogue” that — far from being cultural appropriation — the collection was “kind of an homage” that showed his “respect” for the culture.

He told the magazine that his clients believed in his choices. “They trust me and they will follow me,” he said. Dewan’s striking red-carpet appearance shows why.


Ancient musical instruments get an airing in Athens

Updated 21 June 2018
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Ancient musical instruments get an airing in Athens

  • The phorminx, the kitharis, the krotala and the aulos — string and wind instruments reconstructed by musical group Lyravlos — echoed among marble statues in Athens’s National Archaeological Museum.
  • Music was an integral part of almost every aspect of ancient Greek society, from religious, to social to athletic events.

ATHENS: Hymns sung to the Greek gods thousands of years ago resonated from ancient musical instruments in Athens on Thursday, transporting a transfixed audience to antiquity.
The phorminx, the kitharis, the krotala and the aulos — string and wind instruments reconstructed by musical group Lyravlos — echoed among marble statues in Athens’s National Archaeological Museum as part of World Music Day celebrations.
A family of musicians, Lyravlos have recreated exact replicas of the ancient instruments from natural materials including animal shells, bones, hides and horns.
Music was an integral part of almost every aspect of ancient Greek society, from religious, to social to athletic events. Today only some 60 written scores of ancient Greek music have survived, said Lyravlos member Michael Stefos.
Stefos said they interpret them as best they can, relying on the accuracy of their recreated instruments.
“Joking aside, ancient CDs have never been found,” he said.
Their performance included a hymn to the god Apollo, pieces played at the musical festival of the ancient Pythian Games in Delphi and during wine-laden rituals to the god Dionysus.
Michael’s father Panayiotis Stefos, who heads the group, travels to museums at home and abroad studying ancient Greek antiquities and texts in order to recreate the instruments.
“Usually each instrument has a different sound. It is not something you can make on a computer, it will not be a carbon copy,” said Stefos.
The difference with modern day instruments?
“If someone holds it in their arms and starts playing, after a few minutes they don’t want to let it go, because it vibrates and pulsates with your body,” he said.
French tourist Helene Piaget, who watched the performance, said it was “inspiring.”
“One sees them on statues, on reliefs, and you can’t imagine what they might sound like,” she said.
World Music Day is an annual celebration that takes place on the summer solstice.