Jenna Dewan dazzles in Zuhair Murad outfit at iHeart Radio Music Awards

Jenna Dewan arrives at the iHeart Radio Music Awards on Sunday (AFP)
Updated 13 March 2018
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Jenna Dewan dazzles in Zuhair Murad outfit at iHeart Radio Music Awards

DUBAI: US actress and dancer Jenna Dewan made a stunning appearance on the red carpet at Sunday’s iHeart Radio Music Awards in California. Dewan — a host and mentor on NBC’s “World of Dance” talent show — wore a three-piece outfit from Lebanese designer Zuhair Murad.

Murad’s black-and-red patterned crop top with embellished matching jacket, and black shorts overlaid with a black chiffon high-slitted skirt are part of the designer’s Spring 2018 haute-couture collection, entitled “Indian Summer.”

Dewan, 37, was born in the US to a German-English mother and a Polish-Lebanese father. She got her first major break as a dancer in Janet Jackson’s 2000 video, “Doesn’t Really Matter,” and performed as a backup dancer the following year on Jackson’s “All For You” tour.

In 2006, Dewan starred in the dance-themed romantic movie “Step Up” with Channing Tatum, whom she married in 2009.

Murad was born in Lebanon in 1971. He studied fashion in Paris after finishing high school and has gone on to become one of the Arab world’s most successful designers, worn by Najwa Karam, Taylor Swift, Beyoncé, Shakira, Priyanka Chopra, Jennifer Lopez and many more, including Princess Ameerah Al-Otaibi of Saudi when she attended the wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton.

Murad’s Spring 2018 collection has drawn criticism for the designer’s controversial decision to follow a Native American theme. He explained to “Vogue” that — far from being cultural appropriation — the collection was “kind of an homage” that showed his “respect” for the culture.

He told the magazine that his clients believed in his choices. “They trust me and they will follow me,” he said. Dewan’s striking red-carpet appearance shows why.


Traveling back thousands of years by reviving KSA's Al-Ula

Archaeological treasures in the northwestern region of the Kingdom are older than Saudi Arabia itself, and barely known to the world. (AFP)
Updated 29 min 16 sec ago
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Traveling back thousands of years by reviving KSA's Al-Ula

  • The RCU is joining forces with the Arab World Institute in Paris to produce a touring exhibition

JEDDAH: Bathing in the scorching sun of Saudi Arabia for the past 4,000 years and sitting among the sandy dunes of the northwestern region of the Kingdom, lie the country’s archaeological treasures. These treasures are even older than Saudi Arabia itself, and barely known to the world.
The area covers about 52 hectares of well-preserved land in which there are tombs handcrafted out of the rocks, relics from ancient civilizations such as the Greeks and the Romans, archaeological riches dating back 4,000 years and other priceless artifacts from the Ottoman Empire.
The somewhat forgotten land is going to be brought into the spotlight by the year 2020 as a historic collaboration takes place between Saudi Arabia and France.
France excels in the art of preserving history so it is the perfect alliance to meet the goals of making Al-Ula a tourist attraction.
Saudis are cooperating with France in preserving and promoting culture and archaeology.
The French consider this project so prestigious that Gerard Mestrallet, a special envoy of the president, has been appointed for Al-Ula. Both countries share a common approach to national heritage; that culture transcends all borders and should be accessible to all who seek to observe history.
The agreement was signed in the presence of Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman and French President Emmanuel Macron as well as Al-Ula governor, the special envoy to Al-Ula and France’s foreign minister. Against the walls of Paris’s Musee De Arts Decoratifs — a wing of the Louvre Palace — sit the illuminated sandstones for the French to experience a sliver of Saudi Arabia’s rich heritage. The Royal Commission of Al-Ula (RCU) has signed an agreement with Campus France, described as the leading international academic and vocational public institution in France, to train young Saudi women and men to become aspiring archaeologists.
The RCU is joining forces with the Arab World Institute in Paris to produce a touring exhibition. Public transport, hotels and restaurants are also part of the plan.
More than 2,100 people applied for traineeships: 200 young Saudi men and women will be trained by the most prestigious institutes in the world; part of the 1.2 million new tourist jobs are expected to be created under Vision 2030.
Cutting-edge technologies and methods such as aerial LiDAR (light detection and ranging), scanning and photos taken from light aircraft, helicopter and drones will also be used.