Picasso painting the main draw at Rockefeller art ‘sale of the century’

Christie's employees stand next to 'Fillette a la corbeille fleurie' by Pablo Picasso from the collection of Peggy and David Rockefeller during a sale preview at Christie's auction house in Paris, France March 13, 2018. Picture taken March 13, 2018. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes NO RESALES. NO ARCHIVES
Updated 14 March 2018
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Picasso painting the main draw at Rockefeller art ‘sale of the century’

PARIS: One of Picasso’s most unsettling paintings returns to Paris on Friday more than a century after he painted it in that city, as a taster for what is being billed the art “sale of the century.”
One of the rarest Picasso paintings, once owned by Gertrude Stein, is part of an art trove belonging to the Rockefeller dynasty that could raise half a billion dollars this year, in what auctioneer Christie’s says could be the most valuable sale ever of a private collection.
With the art market surging, the nude “Young Girl With a Flower Basket” is expected to make at least $100 million (81 million euros) when it goes under the hammer in New York in May along with works by Monet, Renoir and Gauguin from the private collection of US billionaires Peggy and David Rockefeller.
Auction house Christie’s expects the sale of the 1,600 works of art amassed by the couple to top $600 million — easily beating the world record set in Paris in 2009 when the collection put together by the fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent and his partner Pierre Berge made $484 million.
They include one of Monet’s waterlily paintings as a well as one of his famously smoky views of St. Lazare station in Paris and three Miro murals which are expected to fetch $25 million.
“It’s a really historic moment, the biggest private collection ever put up for auction,” Christie’s French head Francois de Ricqles told AFP.
It not only represents the works collected by “a couple of great taste,” he said, “but with the addition of the items they inherited reflects the passion of generations of the Rockefeller family for art.”
David Rockefeller, the former head of Chase Manhattan Bank, died last year aged 101, two decades after his wife.
The entire proceeds of the sale will go to charitable causes including Harvard University and conservation groups in the state of Maine, where the Rockefeller family had summer homes.
The Picasso, a masterpiece from his pink period in 1905, is one of 10 works being shown by Sotheby’s in the French capital in the run-up to the sale.
Once owned by Picasso’s friend, the American poet and novelist Gertrude Stein, it has not been shown in Paris in more than 50 years.
Stein initially was troubled by the side-on view and the girl’s “repulsive” feet, but her husband Leo loved it. When they split up, however, she kept the painting for herself, leaving him their Cezannes.
The Rockefellers were equally attached to it, not allowing it to leave their home on 65th Street in New York after they bought it in 1968.
Selected works from the collection are being displayed around the world leading up to the sale.
The Paris show also includes Georges Seurat’s picture of sailing boats, “La Rade de Grandcamp,” which is expected to make up to $30 million and Eugene Delacroix’s “Tiger Playing with a Tortoise” (1862), which has an estimate of $7 million.


Kyrgyz singer receives death threats over feminist video

Updated 21 September 2018
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Kyrgyz singer receives death threats over feminist video

  • Zere Asylbek’s music video ‘Kyz’ became a sensation in the Central Asian country following its release last week
  • In the video Asylbek sings that ‘a time will come when nobody will tell me: Don’t wear it, don’t do it’

BISHKEK, Kyrgyzstan: A 19-year-old singer in Kyrgyzstan has filed a complaint with police after receiving death threats over a music video she released targeting gender discrimination in the ex-Soviet republic.
Zere Asylbek’s music video “Kyz” became a sensation in the Central Asian country following its release last week but has angered conservatives who say it insults national values, focusing on the singer’s visible underwear.
Asylbek said that she had filed reports with police in the capital Bishkek after receiving numerous threats of physical violence including several death threats.
One threat posted by an anonymous Facebook profile to a group on the social media platform threatened to kill her if the video was not deleted.
Another user whose post Asylbek sent as a screenshot to AFP wrote that they “would gladly join” the first commentator, and “rip your head off.”
“Kyz,” which means girl in the Kyrgyz language had had more than 217,000 views on YouTube by Friday and is Asylbek’s first released song.
Asylbek said on Thursday that the video’s main message was to “respect the person you really are” while also “respecting the choices, opinions and ways of life of others.”
The video features Asylbek dressed in a suit jacket and skirt with a purple bra underneath, a woman wearing a hijab, a woman wearing a Kyrgzy-style headscarf and a woman with a partly shaved head, showing Kyrgyz society’s diversity.
In the video Asylbek sings that “a time will come when nobody will tell me: Don’t wear it, don’t do it.”
She also calls on the other women featured in the clip to “join me, create our own freedom.”
Asylbek said that she had expected her choice of different women representing different facets of society to be understood as provocative but was surprised at the online attention devoted to her purple bra.
In a Facebook post her father Asylbek Zhoodonbekov voiced support, calling his daughter “a free-thinking daughter of a free Kyrgyzstan.”
He said she had grown more politically conscious after a recent incident in which a man killed a young woman in a police station after attempting to abduct her for a forced marriage.
The murder in May sparked protests in Kyrgyzstan, a poor, majority-Muslim country where thousands of women are kidnapped for marriage every year in a practice dating back to the country’s nomadic past while law enforcement is accused of ignoring the problem.