James Joyce collection donated to New York library

A statue of James Joyce in Zurich’s Fluntern cemetery, where he is buried. (Reuters)
Updated 16 March 2018
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James Joyce collection donated to New York library

NEW YORK: One of the foremost private collections of works by the influential Irish writer James Joyce has been donated to New York’s Morgan Library and Museum.
The 350-piece collection includes numerous signed and inscribed first editions, photographs, posters and manuscripts, including a fragment of his magnum opus “Ulysses” and rare pressings of 78 RPM recordings of the author.
The collection was assembled by New York gallery owner Sean Kelly and his wife Mary.
“It is difficult to summarize in a few words the importance of this extraordinary gift to the Morgan Library & Museum,” said museum director Colin Bailey.
“It adds enormously to our small but distinguished Joyce collection, and instantly establishes the Morgan as a major center for scholarly research related to the author’s life and work.”
The museum is planning a public exhibition in 2022, the centennial of the publication of “Ulysses.”
Joyce’s life and works are also commemorated at the James Joyce Center in Dublin and in a collection at the University of Buffalo.
The Morgan Library is the former private library of John Pierpont “JP” Morgan, a central figure in the world of finance at the turn of the 20th century.
It was opened to the public by his son following his death and has since become a museum focused on literature.


What We Are Reading Today: Reading Machiavelli

Updated 19 September 2018
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What We Are Reading Today: Reading Machiavelli

Author: John P. McCormick

To what extent was Machiavelli a “Machiavellian”? Was he an amoral adviser of tyranny or a stalwart partisan of liberty? A neutral technician of power politics or a devout Italian patriot? A reviver of pagan virtue or initiator of modern nihilism? Reading Machiavelli answers these questions through original interpretations of Niccolò Machiavelli’s three major political works— The Prince, Discourses, and Florentine Histories— and demonstrates that a radically democratic populism seeded the Florentine’s scandalous writings. John McCormick challenges the misguided understandings of Machiavelli set forth by prominent thinkers, including Jean-Jacques Rousseau and representatives of the Straussian and Cambridge schools.
McCormick emphasizes the fundamental, often unacknowledged elements of a vibrant Machiavellian politics: The utility of vigorous class conflict between elites and common citizens for virtuous democratic republics, the necessity of political and economic equality for genuine civic liberty, and the indispensability of religious tropes for the exercise of effective popular judgment.
Interrogating the established reception of Machiavelli’s work by such readers as Rousseau, Leo Strauss, Quentin Skinner, and J.G.A. Pocock, McCormick exposes what was effectively an elite conspiracy to suppress the Florentine’s contentious, egalitarian politics. In recovering the too-long-concealed quality of Machiavelli’s populism, this book acts as a Machiavellian critique of Machiavelli scholarship.
Advancing fresh renderings of works by Machiavelli while demonstrating how they have been misread previously, Reading Machiavelli presents a new outlook for how politics should be conceptualized and practiced.