James Joyce collection donated to New York library

A statue of James Joyce in Zurich’s Fluntern cemetery, where he is buried. (Reuters)
Updated 16 March 2018
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James Joyce collection donated to New York library

NEW YORK: One of the foremost private collections of works by the influential Irish writer James Joyce has been donated to New York’s Morgan Library and Museum.
The 350-piece collection includes numerous signed and inscribed first editions, photographs, posters and manuscripts, including a fragment of his magnum opus “Ulysses” and rare pressings of 78 RPM recordings of the author.
The collection was assembled by New York gallery owner Sean Kelly and his wife Mary.
“It is difficult to summarize in a few words the importance of this extraordinary gift to the Morgan Library & Museum,” said museum director Colin Bailey.
“It adds enormously to our small but distinguished Joyce collection, and instantly establishes the Morgan as a major center for scholarly research related to the author’s life and work.”
The museum is planning a public exhibition in 2022, the centennial of the publication of “Ulysses.”
Joyce’s life and works are also commemorated at the James Joyce Center in Dublin and in a collection at the University of Buffalo.
The Morgan Library is the former private library of John Pierpont “JP” Morgan, a central figure in the world of finance at the turn of the 20th century.
It was opened to the public by his son following his death and has since become a museum focused on literature.


What We Are Reading Today: Muqtada Al-Sadr and the Battle for the Future of Iraq

Updated 20 May 2018
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What We Are Reading Today: Muqtada Al-Sadr and the Battle for the Future of Iraq

  • Al-Sadr has reinvented himself as a leader willing to campaign against corrupt government and is opposed to Iranian influence in Iraq’s affairs.

Official Iraqi election results have placed Muqtada Al-Sadr, the volatile Shiite cleric, in the position of kingmaker — a remarkable comeback for a man who once sent his militia fighters into battle with US soldiers.

Since his time fighting the US, Al-Sadr has reinvented himself as a leader willing to campaign against corrupt government and is opposed to Iranian influence in Iraq’s affairs.

This book by Patrick Cockburn offers an insight into how Al-Sadr positioned himself during the years after the US-led invasion of Iraq and the downfall of Saddam Hussein, and examines why he is so pivotal to the future of the country.

Al-Sadr is revealed as a complex character and sophisticated politician.

As he sets about deciding who will form the next government, this maverick figure’s difficult, bloody and at times tragic past makes compelling reading.