James Joyce collection donated to New York library

A statue of James Joyce in Zurich’s Fluntern cemetery, where he is buried. (Reuters)
Updated 16 March 2018
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James Joyce collection donated to New York library

NEW YORK: One of the foremost private collections of works by the influential Irish writer James Joyce has been donated to New York’s Morgan Library and Museum.
The 350-piece collection includes numerous signed and inscribed first editions, photographs, posters and manuscripts, including a fragment of his magnum opus “Ulysses” and rare pressings of 78 RPM recordings of the author.
The collection was assembled by New York gallery owner Sean Kelly and his wife Mary.
“It is difficult to summarize in a few words the importance of this extraordinary gift to the Morgan Library & Museum,” said museum director Colin Bailey.
“It adds enormously to our small but distinguished Joyce collection, and instantly establishes the Morgan as a major center for scholarly research related to the author’s life and work.”
The museum is planning a public exhibition in 2022, the centennial of the publication of “Ulysses.”
Joyce’s life and works are also commemorated at the James Joyce Center in Dublin and in a collection at the University of Buffalo.
The Morgan Library is the former private library of John Pierpont “JP” Morgan, a central figure in the world of finance at the turn of the 20th century.
It was opened to the public by his son following his death and has since become a museum focused on literature.


What We Are Reading Today: Preventing Palestine A political History from Camp David to Oslo

Updated 18 August 2018
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What We Are Reading Today: Preventing Palestine A political History from Camp David to Oslo

On the 40th anniversary of the Camp David Accords, a groundbreaking new history shows how Egyptian-Israeli peace ensured lasting Palestinian statelessness.
For 70 years Israel has existed as a state, and for 40 years it has honored a peace treaty with Egypt. Yet the Palestinians — the would-be beneficiaries of a vision for a comprehensive regional settlement that led to the Camp David Accords in 1978 — remain stateless to this day. How and why Palestinian statelessness persists are the central questions of Seth Anziska’s groundbreaking book, which explores the complex legacy of the agreement brokered by President Jimmy Carter, says a review on the Princeton University Press website. Preventing Palestine charts the emergence of the Middle East peace process, including the establishment of a separate track to deal with the issue of Palestine. At the very start of this process, Anziska argues, Egyptian-Israeli peace came at the expense of the sovereignty of the Palestinians, whose aspirations for a homeland alongside Israel faced crippling challenges.