Album review: “Ensenity” — Emel Mathlouthi

Emel Mathlouthi (AFP)
Updated 17 March 2018

Album review: “Ensenity” — Emel Mathlouthi

Emel Mathlouthi has long endured, and enjoyed, comparisons to Björk, and the daring, dazzling Tunisian singer-songwriter’s latest release will do little to plug the current. “Ensenity” is a collection of “reworkings” based on her acclaimed second album, 2017’s “Ensen” — a tasty, guest-produced coda arriving little more than a year after the main event.

There is a distinctly Björk-ish feel to this turn: It was the Icelandic icon who popularized the remix album more than 20 years ago with “Telegram” — a collection of guest remixes of Björk’s own second album, “Post” — and she has proceeded to release alternative and/or live versions of all but two of her eight “proper” albums to date. But “Ensenity” is pointedly a collection of “reworkings” – not “remixes” — presumably to highlight that many of these fresh takes tout newly recorded, or perhaps deleted, instrumental layers, rather than strictly electronic trickery.

Built around beats, vamps and dirges, but perennially stained with searing vocal laments soaring above the audio storm, the stark, primal music of “Ensen” is genetically suited to the endeavor. Reworked by Cubenx, the tribal drive of “Ensen Dhaif” is stripped down and spaced out, Mathlouthi’s processed cries emerging from a misty fog somewhere in the distance.

Most often, the strategy is to magnify an existing element of a track, elevating the micro to macro. The trip-hop influences already evident in “Sallem,” for example, are further massaged by the live drums driving Free the Robots’ groovier, moodier take. The jagged, unnervingly relentless riffing of “Thamlaton,” however, is disappointedly diluted by Karim Attoumane’s overwrought, spooky sci-fi effects and misplaced barrage of emo guitar.

Oddly the more introspective material fares best: In Ash Koosha’s hands, the mellow invocation of “Kaddesh” is sped up, imbued with disorientating subterranean warbles and glitches, while the reflective electro-simmer of “Layem” takes shades of mature, minimal R&B, courtesy of Muudra, without sacrificing an atom of the emotional urgency which defines Mathlouthi’s singular songwriting.


Egyptian DJ Raveland makes melting-pot music from the UAE

DJ Raveland was raised in Abu Dhabi. (Supplied)
Updated 19 August 2019

Egyptian DJ Raveland makes melting-pot music from the UAE

DUBAI: The Egyptian music producer and DJ who goes by the name Raveland has surprised his fans with a new hit this summer. 

Raveland hosts concerts around the UAE. (Supplied)

Honoring the Swedish musician Avicii, who died in Oman last year, “My Way” is an old-school house music track. “Avicii was one of my idols. Nothing will top his productions, but I wanted to bring back this vibe to the industry,” the artist told Arab News. 

“‘My Way’ is different from everything I have done before. It is calm, and focuses more on the vocals and the melody,” he added. 

The musician, who is signed with Universal Music MENA, was able to build a large fan base with tracks and mix tapes reaching more than 100,000 streams and downloads internationally. 

The DJ’s ambitions pushed him to release a music video for his track “Rêve” on Vevo that featured one of his events in Abu Dhabi with fans enjoying his various music genres.

Raised in Abu Dhabi, Raveland has been touring around the UAE to perform his tracks, including “Resolution 19,” “Dreamville” and “Way to Tomorrowland.”

In June, he released an extended play – a short album featuring four tracks – called “28.” From trance to romantic, “28” had it all. 

Raveland released his recent album "28" this summer. (Supplied)

Under the big umbrella of electronic dance music, Raveland’s productions bring different cultures together. One of his “28” tracks, “Auaha,” is inspired by New Zealand’s old tribes. “My passion for music is endless. I am constantly trying to explore more genres and more types of music to target a larger audience.” 

Raveland has previously collaborated with musicians such as the UAE-based DJ XABB and the Tunisian DJ Eyjey. Exclusively to Arab News, Raveland announced that he is working on a piece that follows the Latino genre reggaeton, like the famous “Despacito” hit, in collaboration with a Puerto Rican singer. 

The DJ also promised to bring back his online radio show, called “We Are Ravelands,” which has been on hiatus for a few months. “I will bring it back, real strong,” the host said. “The show will feature a lot of collaborations from all around the world, like Egypt, Spain and the US.”