Muslim World League chief signs deal with Land Identity Project

The secretary-general of the Muslim World League (MWL), Dr. Mohammed bin Abdul Karim Al-Issa, presides a meeting with diplomats in Tokyo. (AN photo)
Updated 19 March 2018
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Muslim World League chief signs deal with Land Identity Project

JEDDAH: The secretary-general of the Muslim World League (MWL), Dr. Mohammed bin Abdul Karim Al-Issa, signed an agreement with Hiroko Kawahara, president of the Land Identity Project, which calls for harmony, peace and teaching children the value of civilization.
Fabricated religious and intellectual conflicts have produced many forms of hate, extremism and terrorism, said Al-Issa, who accused the “materialistic” media of significantly fueling conflicts.
He was speaking in Japan, where he met with members of the diplomatic corps at the invitation of Waleed Siam, dean of the Arab diplomatic corps.
Al-Issa also attended an international symposium hosted by Japan’s Foreign Ministry and attended by Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Kono, who received him before the start of the symposium and discussed with him issues of common interest.
Al-Issa said there are many reasons for the emergence of extremism, including a perceived sense of abuse or marginalization, and a lack of justice.
In general, contemporary terrorist organizations were established against the backdrop of political conflicts, giving them religious interpretations, he added.
The biggest danger facing the world is the globalization of extremism, which used to be confined geographically, he said, adding that extremism “should be faced with counter-ideology.”
Al-Issa urged societies to enhance their national fabric and fight all forms of religious and ethnic discrimination.
“When religion takes hold in the minds of individuals, it does not constitute a mere transient choice. Rather, it becomes an important entity that affects their feelings and actions,” he said.
“Unless there is a deep awareness of the reality of religion and an integrated national unification, we will find cases of unconscious religiosity with negative behavior.”
He stressed the importance of preventing religious, political or ideological messages that may isolate any community from its societal context, or calls to rally against the state.
“We must also distinguish between the philosophy of some countries that calls for the separation of religion from the state, and respect for the conviction of followers of all religions, as this may trigger religious sensitivities,” he said.


Green light for crown prince-led Saudi privatization program

Updated 25 April 2018
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Green light for crown prince-led Saudi privatization program

  • The Privatization Program is one of 12 key elements of the Saudi Arabia’s Vision 2030
  • The program is aimed at increasing job opportunities for Saudi nationals

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia’s Council of Economic and Development Affairs on Tuesday approved the Privatization Program that is one of 12 key elements of the Kingdom’s Vision 2030. 

The program is aimed at increasing job opportunities for Saudi nationals, attracting the latest technologies and innovations, and supporting economic development.

It encourages both local and foreign investment in order to enhance the role of the private sector, with government entities adopting a regulatory and supervisory role. The aim is to increase the private sector’s contribution to GDP from 40 percent to 65 percent by 2030. 

The program will aim to reach its objectives through encouraging the private sector to invest in establishing new schools, universities and health centers, while the government pursues its organizational and supervisory role in health and education.

The privatization program aims to benefit from previous success stories, with the private sector’s collaboration in the development of infrastructure, and its involvement on a large scale in sectors such as energy, water, transport, telecommunications, petrochemicals and finance.

The program sets out a series of objectives in three areas: Developing a general legal framework for policies related to privatization; establishing organizational foundations and dedicated institutions to execute the policies; and setting a timescale for their delivery. 

The Council of Economic and Development Affairs is headed by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.