Bomb-proof checkpoints inaugurated in Peshawar

KP’s inspector general of police, Salahuddin Khan Mehsud, inaugurating the bomb-proof checkpoints in Peshawar on Monday. (Photo courtesy: Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Police)
Updated 19 March 2018
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Bomb-proof checkpoints inaugurated in Peshawar

ISLAMABAD: Khyber Pakhtunkhwa’s (KP) inspector general of police, Salahuddin Khan Mehsud, on Monday inaugurated 31 bomb-proof checkpoints in the provincial capital Peshawar.
The checkpoints are “really needed,” the police said in a statement. Salman Khan, KP police director general of public relations, told Arab News: “The checkpoints will save the lives of policemen performing their duties.”
He added: “This initiative will help police fight the war against terrorism more effectively.” Police station buildings are also being upgraded, he said.
The checkpoints were set up in Badaber area, which borders the Khyber tribal region, which is infamous for militant attacks against police and other security forces.
According to KP police statistics, since 2006 more than 1,200 policemen have been killed by militants.


India’s Parliament rejects no confidence motion against Modi

Updated 42 min 53 sec ago
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India’s Parliament rejects no confidence motion against Modi

  • After a marathon 12 hours of debate more than 60 percent of the lower house voted in the BJP’s favor
  • The opposition Congress party leader Rahul Gandhi crossed the chamber during debate to give an awkward embrace to a seated and clearly surprised Modi

NEW DELHI: India’s ruling party sailed through a confidence vote in a theatrical parliamentary session which saw a startled Prime Minister Narendra Modi embraced by his chief political foe.
Modi’s Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) was in no danger of losing its first confidence motion since taking power four years ago, which was prompted by a minor party walking out of the governing coalition.
After a marathon 12 hours of debate, more than 60 percent of the lower house voted in the BJP’s favor, but the vote was overshadowed by the theatrics of bitter Modi rival Rahul Gandhi.
The opposition Congress party leader crossed the chamber during debate to give an awkward embrace to a seated and clearly surprised Modi.
“You can abuse me and call me names but I don’t have any hatred toward you,” Gandhi said to cheers from Congress lawmakers just before he hugged his rival.
After gathering his wits, Modi called Gandhi again to shake hands and pat his back, and the opposition leader winked mischieviously at Congress colleagues after returning to his seat.
Congress later voted against Modi’s government despite the brief bonhomie on the parliament floor.
The hug has since gone viral on social media and endlessly dissected non-stop on India’s cable TV channels and went viral on social media, with some praising Gandhi’s apparent gesture of goodwill.
“Earlier opposition parties... always managed to transcend rivalry at certain crucial moments,” said independent analyst Shiv Vishwanathan in comments to the Hindustan.
“Today, Rahul Gandhi captured that history.”
But Modi was less convinced of Gandhi’s sincerity, later telling parliament he was confused by Gandhi’s “childish” behavior.
Modi and Gandhi’s running war of words has escalated since polls showed a decline in the BJP’s popularity, fanning hopes of an opposition comeback in next year’s elections after a Congress rout in 2014.