Joelle hits Riyadh to launch new beauty clinic

Joelle Mardinian (Image credit: Ana Szabo/WhiteChateaux)
Updated 19 March 2018
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Joelle hits Riyadh to launch new beauty clinic

DUBAI: Lebanese beauty mogul Joelle Mardinian opened a new branch of Clinica Joelle — her chain of cosmetic clinics — in Riyadh on Sunday. On Instagram, Mardinian described the opening as “a special night.”
Aside from her wide-ranging beauty business, which has branches throughout the Arab world and beyond, Mardinian is a veteran TV presenter and one of the region’s most-popular social-media influencers, with over 7 million Instagram followers.
The 42-year-old began her career as a make-up artist and moved to Dubai from London in 2004. She quickly landed her own beauty show, “Joelle,” on MBC and in 2008 she launched her chain of salons, Maison de Joelle. In 2010, she was appointed regional creative director of cosmetics giant Max Factor.
Speaking to Arab News about that partnership in 2016, Mardinian said: “I love Max Factor and I have a lot of passion for the brand. It is 100 years old, so the history makes me even more overwhelmed… It is an honor for me to represent Arab women and to introduce new trends using their new products.”
Mardinian is already renowned for her willingness to talk openly about herself — particularly when it comes to cosmetic treatments — but this year, fans will apparently have even greater access to her life when she launches her new ‘Kardashians’-style reality show in which a camera crew follows her around 24/7.
“I have always been so transparent all of my life so I want the cameras to see things they haven’t seen yet,” she told UAE daily Gulf News in November. “I want viewers to see the real me, so they will see everything.”


’Blurred Lines’ legal saga ends in $5mn ruling favoring Marvin Gaye family

Updated 22 min 16 sec ago
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’Blurred Lines’ legal saga ends in $5mn ruling favoring Marvin Gaye family

  • “The verdict handicaps any creator out there who is making something that might be inspired by something else,” Pharell Williams said
  • The initial award in the case had triggered an angry response from many songwriters, who argued that there were major differences between the two songs at the center of the legal battle

LOS ANGELES: A long-running copyright dispute over the smash hit “Blurred Lines” has ended with the family of Motown legend Marvin Gaye winning a nearly $5 million judgment against Robin Thicke and Pharrell Williams.
Thicke and Williams had been accused by Gaye’s estate of copyright infringement for their 2013 hit because of similarities with the late singer’s “Got to Give It Up.”
In 2015, the estate was awarded more than $7 million but the amount was later reduced to $5.3 million
Thicke and Pharrell appealed that judgment and a California judge earlier this year overall upheld the jury’s decision.
In a December 6 final ruling in the case made public on Thursday, US District Judge John Kronstadt ordered Thicke, Williams and Williams’ publishing company to pay Gaye’s estate $2.9 million in damages, US media reported.
Thicke was ordered to pay an additional $1.76 million. Williams and his publishing company must also separately pay Gay’s estate nearly $360,000.
Gaye’s family was also rewarded 50 percent of the song’s royalties.
The verdict caps a long-drawn legal battle that was closely watched by the music industry.
The initial award in the case had triggered an angry response from many songwriters, who argued that there were major differences between the two songs at the center of the legal battle, including the melodies and lyrics.
Williams, a popular songwriter who had another smash hit with “Happy,” said in an interview in 2015 that all creative people had inspirations.
“The verdict handicaps any creator out there who is making something that might be inspired by something else,” he said at the time.
“If we lose our freedom to be inspired, we’re going to look up one day and the entertainment industry as we know it will be frozen in litigation.”
Representatives of both Williams and Thicke could not be immediately reached for comment.