Apple developing own screens using next-generation tech

A visitor uses her iPhone X to take a photo of Apple Park t-shirts at the new Apple Visitor Center in Cupertino. The company plans to develop its own new screen technology according to media reports. (Reuters)
Updated 20 March 2018
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Apple developing own screens using next-generation tech

LONDON: Apple is developing its own MicroLED device displays and has made small numbers of the screens for testing, Bloomberg reported, in a move that could hurt Asian display suppliers to the US tech giant over the long-term.
MicroLED is a new display technology that has grabbed the attention of several tech firms. Screens using MicroLED are thinner, brighter, use less power and are more durable than the OLED displays that are increasingly being adopted for a variety of smart devices.
The new technology is however unproven and difficult to use, analysts said.
“It is not clear whether MicroLED will be better than the OLED displays Apple uses for its smartwatches. At this point, this seems to me that Apple wants to show off — it’s more of ‘look what we can do’ rather than a realistic alternative,” said Dongbu Securities analyst S.R. Kwon.
Apple is developing MicroLED screens at a secret plant in California in a project overseen by Lynn Youngs, who is in charge of iPhone and Apple Watch screen technology, Bloomberg said, citing people familiar with the matter.
The company aims to use the new technology in its wearable computers first, the report said, adding that it is unlikely to reach an iPhone for at least three to five years.
Apple declined to comment.
Shares in Asian display makers initially slid on the news on Monday but later pared losses. Shares in Sharp, Japan Display and LG Display ended the day between 1.6 percent and 2.4 percent lower.
Other tech giants looking at the technology include Taiwan’s Hon Hai Precision Industry, Apple’s main contract manufacturer. It acquired US MicroLED display startup eLux Inc. last year through Sharp Corp. and other group units.
Sony Corp. started selling large display systems using the technology for corporate users last year, and Samsung Electronics unveiled a MicroLED TV this January.


Iran falls to sixth biggest oil supplier to India as sanctions bite

Updated 14 December 2018
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Iran falls to sixth biggest oil supplier to India as sanctions bite

  • Tehran dropped two places to become only the sixth biggest supplier after New Delhi cut purchases due to the impact of US sanctions
  • The UAE, which was the sixth biggest oil seller to India in October, became the third-top seller to India in November

NEW DELHI: India’s monthly oil imports from Iran plunged to their lowest in a year in November with Tehran dropping two places to become only the sixth biggest supplier after New Delhi cut purchases due to the impact of US sanctions, according to ship tracking data and industry sources.
Last month, the US introduced tough sanctions aimed at crippling Iran’s oil revenue-dependent economy. Washington did, though, give a six-month waiver from sanctions to eight nations, including India, and allowed them to import some Iranian oil.
India is restricted to buying 1.25 million tons per month, or about 300,000 barrels per day (bpd).
In November, India imported about 276,000 bpd of Iranian oil, a decline of about 41 percent from October and about 4 percent more than the year-ago month, ship tracking data obtained from shipping and trade sources showed.
After abandoning the 2015 Iran nuclear deal, US President Donald Trump is trying to force Tehran to quash not only its nuclear ambitions and its ballistic missile program but its support for militant proxies in Syria, Yemen, Lebanon and other parts of the Middle East.
India’s imports from Iran in November, included some parcels that were loaded in October. In November, Iraq and Saudi Arabia continued to be the top-two oil sellers to India.
The UAE, which was the sixth biggest oil seller to India in October, became the third-top seller to India in November, knocking down Venezuela to fourth position.