Israeli military confirms it hit Syrian nuclear site in 2007

This photo released by the Israel Defense Forces shows what was believed to be a nuclear reactor site that was destroyed by Israel, in the Deir el-Zour region, 450 kilometers (about 300 miles) northwest of Damascus, Syria.(AFP)
Updated 21 March 2018
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Israeli military confirms it hit Syrian nuclear site in 2007

TEL AVIV, Israel: The Israeli military has confirmed it carried out the 2007 airstrike in Syria that destroyed what was believed to be a nuclear reactor, lifting the veil of secrecy over one of its most daring and mysterious operations in recent memory.
Although Israel was widely believed to have been behind the Sept. 6, 2007, airstrike, it has never before commented publicly on it.
In a lengthy release, the military revealed that eight F-15 fighter jets carried out the top-secret airstrikes against the facility in the Deir Ezzor region, destroying a site that had been in development for years and was scheduled to go into operation at the end of that year.
The military would not comment on its decision to go public on one of the country’s closest held secrets.


Syrian refugee turns his escape into a video game

Updated 20 March 2019
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Syrian refugee turns his escape into a video game

  • Karam left Hama in 2014, crossed the border into Turkey then started the long and arduous trek through Europe
  • Karam bumped into games developer Georg Hobmeier in Salzburg and the pair started working on “Path Out”

SALZBURG, Austria: Abdullah Adnan Karam stares down at the computer screen and watches the story of his escape from war-torn Syria to his new home in Austria play out step by step as a game.
The 23-year-old left the northwestern city of Hama in 2014, crossed the border into Turkey then started the long and arduous trek through Europe.
A year later, after his arrival in Austria, he bumped into games developer Georg Hobmeier in Salzburg and the pair started working on what would become the PC/Mac game “Path Out.”
“What the player is kind of playing is part of my story, let’s say. My (personal) story had more action in it,” Karam told Reuters Television.
Karam provided the story and Hobmeier’s company Causa Creations, alongside Vienna-based firm Wobblersound and Austrian-American graphic designer Brian Main, worked on the technical side.
Players can choose different routes and meet different fates. “Remember guys, don’t get me killed,” Karam says in a promotional video.
The story starts before the war, letting players move Karam through his home, meeting friends and relatives, before the scene degenerates into a battlefield.