Most famed Arab actresses who were magnificent mothers on screen

Updated 21 March 2018
0

Most famed Arab actresses who were magnificent mothers on screen

CAIRO: Arab cinema fans would hardly forget some of the Middle East’s iconic actresses who brilliantly played the role of mothers on screen, for their memorable roles are deeply ingrained within their audiences.

And as the region marks Mother’s Day, Arab News is honored to shed light on some of these magnificent cinematic mothers.

Amina Rezk (1910 — 2003)
Rezk was a popular Egyptian actress who took part in 208 artworks and is known for her roles as the kind-hearted mother in plays and films. Her most notable motherly roles include “Do3a2 Al Karawan” aka The Nightingale’s Prayer; “Bidaya wa Nehaya” aka A Beginning and an End, and “Kandil Om Hashem” or The Lamp of Umm Hashim.



Ferdos Mohamed (1906 — 1961)
She is one of the greatest mother’s in Egyptian cinema, who probably haven’t played any other role expect for a loving mother.



Karima Mokhtar (1934 — 2017)
There is no doubt that “Mama Noona” is on the top of the list, a character played by Mukhtar dubbed as one of her many successful motherly roles. The legendary Egyptian actress has perfectly prorated the Egyptian mother in many of her roles, inlcuding the caring Karima in “Ya Rab Wald” and the pan-Arab loved play “Al Ayal Kibrit.”



Faten Hamama (1931 — 2015)
While cinema-goers are used to seeing her as an elegant and beautiful icon of Egyptian cinema, Faten Hamama has played significant motherly roles over the course of her career, such as “Emberatoriet meem” or Empire M, which tells the story of a wealthy widow who struggles to raise her six children.



Abla Kamel
The Egyptian actress is known for her stellar performances across the Arab world. Her most memorable role is playing Fatma, the hard-working wife of a self-made millionaire in the iconic rags-to-riches story, “Lan Aish fi Jilbab Abi.”



Hayat Al Fahd
The legendary Kuwaiti actress is known for motherly roles across the Gulf and often appeared as the caregiver of the family, and is known as ‘The Lady of the Khaliji small screen.’


UAE gift helps French palace reopen ‘forgotten theater’

Updated 18 June 2019
0

UAE gift helps French palace reopen ‘forgotten theater’

  • Now called the Sheikh Khalifa bin Zayed Al-Nahyan Theatre, it is the latest example of the close relations between Paris and Abu Dhabi
  • The UAE capital already hosts the Louvre Abu Dhabi, opened by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Zayed and President Emmanuel Macron in 2017

FONTAINEBLEAU: An exquisite 19th-century French theater outside Paris that fell into disuse for one and half centuries has been restored with the help of a €10 million donation from oil-rich Abu Dhabi.
The Napoleon III theater at Fontainebleau Palace south of Paris was built between 1853 and 1856 under the reign of the nephew of emperor Napoleon I.
It opened in 1857 but was used only a dozen times, which has helped preserve its gilded adornments, before being abandoned in 1870 after the fall of Napoleon III.
But during a state visit to France in 2007, Sheikh Khalifa, ruler of Abu Dhabi and president of the United Arab Emirates, was reportedly entranced by the abandoned theater and offered €10 million ($11.2 million) on the spot for its restoration.
After a project that has lasted 12 years the theater is now being reopened.
An official inauguration is expected soon, hosted by French Culture Minister Franck Riester and attended by UAE Foreign Minister Abdullah bin Zayed Al-Nahyan.
Now called the Sheikh Khalifa bin Zayed Al-Nahyan Theatre, it is the latest example of the close relations between Paris and Abu Dhabi.
The UAE capital already hosts the Louvre Abu Dhabi, opened by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Zayed and President Emmanuel Macron in 2017, the first foreign institution to carry the name of the great Paris museum.
For all its ornate beauty, the theater has hardly ever been used for its orginal purpose, hosting only a dozen performances between 1857 and 1868, each attended by around 400 people.
“While it had been forgotten, the theater was in an almost perfect state,” said the head of the Fontainebleau Palace, Jean-Francois Hebert.
“Let us not waste this jewel, and show this extraordinary place of decorative arts,” he added.
According to the palace, the theater is “probably the last in Europe to have kept almost all its original machinery, lighting and decor.”
Having such a theater was the desire of Napoleon III’s wife Eugenie. But after the defeat, his capture in the Franco-Prussian war in 1870 and the declaration of France’s Third Republic, the theater fell into virtual oblivion.
Following the renovation, the theater will mainly be a place to visit and admire, rather than for regularly holding concerts.
“The aim is not to give the theater back to its first vocation” given its “very fragile structure,” said Hebert.
Short shows and recitals may be performed in exceptional cases, under the tightest security measures and fire regulations. But regular guided tours will allow visitors to discover the site, including the stage sets.
The restoration aimed to use as little new material as possible, with 80 percent of the original material preserved.
The opulent central chandelier — three meters high and 2.5 meters wide — has been restored to its original form.