Ousted Pakistan PM terms Panama-gate verdict ‘contempt of public mandate’

Former Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif. (AFP)
Updated 21 March 2018
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Ousted Pakistan PM terms Panama-gate verdict ‘contempt of public mandate’

ISLAMABAD: Pakistan’s former Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif on Wednesday said that the Supreme Court verdict in the Panama Papers corruption case against him showed “contempt” for the public mandate.
Talking to reporters outside the court conducting corruption proceedings against him, he said that prominent lawyers and legal experts had described the case — and subsequent Supreme Court judgment — as weak.
“Now voices are being raised from inside and outside the Supreme Court,” he said. He was referring to remarks made by Justice Qazi Faiz Isa on Tuesday in the Supreme Court. Isa noted that although the Panama Papers case involved Sharif family’s London flats, the former premier was disqualified from office last year for holding a UAE iqama or residence permit.
Last month, Pakistan’s Supreme Court ordered that Nawaz Sharif be removed as head of the political party he founded, six months after the Supreme Court had disqualified him from office.
Now the three-times former prime minister has used the judge’s remarks to back up his claim that last year's Supreme Court verdict was flawed.
“I was disqualified for not taking a salary from my son,” he said. “The judgment is not right in my and the nation’s opinion.”
Sharif said that his disqualification from office was contempt of the people of Pakistan. “Where should these people go to file a contempt case?” he asked, challenging the judges to see whether the people accept their verdicts.
“There is a need to review why such judgments are delivered,” he said. Sharif added that such decisions resulted in “aftershocks” that were “impossible” to control.
However, senior advocate Sharafat Ali told Arab News: “A politician can try to build his political case on the basis of remarks of the judges, but, in reality, this will have zero impact on legal proceedings in the court of law.”
As for the Supreme Judicial Council, he said if the former premier filed a case against a Supreme Court judge it would have “serious political repercussions for his party.”
“Filing a complaint with the Supreme Judicial Council against any judge could turn into a movement against the ruling party (Pakistan Muslim League-Nawaz, the party Nawaz Sharif led), so they won’t be advised to do it,” he said.
“The best recourse available to Nawaz Sharif is to fight his cases in the courts, despite all the reservations,” he said.
Professor Tahir Malik, a political analyst, said Nawaz Sharif and his family could get rid of all corruption cases against them by producing documentary evidence to prove that they bought their foreign properties with legitimate money.
“Nawaz Sharif’s rhetoric against (the) judiciary will lose (its) appeal to the public if he fails to present evidence of his innocence anytime soon,” he told Arab News.


Indonesian fishermen return home after release from Philippines militants

Updated 20 September 2018
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Indonesian fishermen return home after release from Philippines militants

  • With the release of the trio, all Indonesians abducted by Filipino militants before 2018 have been released
  • Indonesia, Malaysia and the Philippines wil boost security cooperation in the Sulu Sea, which is a busy maritime area for fishing boats and cargo vessels transporting coal from Indonesia to the Philippines

JAKARTA: After 20 months being held hostage by militants in the southern Philippines, three Indonesian fishermen were finally reunited on Wednesday with their respective families at the Foreign Ministry.

Vice Foreign Minister A.M. Fachir handed them over from the government to their respective family representatives in a ceremony which was held without media presence.
 
"The condition on the field was getting more difficult. But we made the most of our contacts and assets on the field, and with the Philippines government support we were able to get them released,” Fachir said in a statement from the ministry. .
 
Lalu Muhammad Iqbal, the Foreign Ministry’s director for protection of Indonesians abroad, said the handover was held in private because “it was not a cause for celebration.”
 
“We are grateful for their release, but we still have two Indonesians who were abducted on Sept. 11 and we don’t want to hurt their families’ feeling,” Iqbal said.
 
The three fishermen are Hamdan bin Saleng, Sudarling bin Samansunga, and Subandi bin Sattu, who hail from Selayar and Bulukumba in South Sulawesi province. They were freed from their captors on Friday in Sulu province on the southern Philippines.
 
Rudi Wahyudin, a representative of Sattu’s family, said the family members were devastated during the 20 months Sattu was held hostage but they tried to keep their hopes up by keeping in touch with the foreign ministry to get updates of efforts to release him and his fellow fishermen.
 
“It’s normal for people in our village in Bulukumba to migrate and work abroad. Now his wife has asked Sattu to quit working overseas and find another job close to home instead,” Wahyudin said.
 
Indonesian ambassador to the Philippines, Sinyo Harry Sarundajang said the military attache and he flew to Zamboanga City to pick up the three men, after the embassy received information of their release from the West Mindanao Command.
 
“We thank President Duterte and the Philippines government for their attention and cooperation on this matter. It was a long and delicate process to release them and we had to be very careful because we didn’t want anyone to become victim in the process,” Sarundajang said at the press conference.    
 
According to the ambassador, the three men were moved and had to island-hopped to various small islands on the Sulu archipelago as their captors were avoiding the Philippine military operation.
 
The three men were working as crew members in a Malaysian fishing boat when they were abducted in the waters of Sabah in Malaysia on Jan 2017.
 
Iqbal said there are about 6,000 Indonesians working in fishing vessels in Sabah. Since 2016, there has been 34 Indonesian citizens who were kidnapped by armed militants in the southern Philippines and 13 of them were fishermen who were abducted from their vessels in the waters of Sabah.
 
With the release of the trio, all Indonesians abducted by Filipino militants before 2018 have been released.
 
“We are now working to release the two fishermen who were abducted on Sep 11. We have expressed our concerns to the Malaysian authority on the lack of security on their waters,” Iqbal said.
 
He added that Indonesia, Malaysia and the Philippines would boost security cooperation in the Sulu Sea between the three countries, which is a busy maritime area for fishing boats and cargo vessels transporting coal from Indonesia to the Philippines.
 
The three neighboring countries agreed in May 2016 to launch joint patrols in the area following a series of hijacking and kidnapping of Indonesian vessels and crew members. The initial maritime patrol was launched in June 2017 and was beefed up with air patrols in Oct 2017.