Jaguar Land Rover vehicles to use BlackBerry software

Under the deal, terms of which were not disclosed, BlackBerry will license its QNX software for cars and Certicom security technology to Jaguar Land Rover. (Reuters)
Updated 22 March 2018
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Jaguar Land Rover vehicles to use BlackBerry software

BENGALURU: Luxury carmaker Jaguar Land Rover will use BlackBerry Ltd’s infotainment and security software in its vehicles, the companies said on Thursday.
The licensing deal with Tata Motors Ltd’s JLR is the Canadian firm’s latest in the automobile industry following agreements with Qualcomm Inc, Baidu Inc. and Aptiv.
Under the deal, terms of which were not disclosed, BlackBerry will license its QNX software for cars and Certicom security technology to JLR.
The Waterloo, Ontario-based company has sought to reinvent itself after the collapse of its smartphone business, focusing on a rapidly changing auto industry that is racing to add more autonomous features and ultimately build self-driving cars.
BlackBerry’s shares have risen more-than 80 percent in Toronto in the past year.
The QNX unit, which has long been used to run car infotainment consoles, is expected to start generating revenue in 2019.
“Connected and autonomous vehicles will react and drive based on rich data. Our platforms help process data efficiently and keep it secure and trusted,” said John Wall, general manager of BlackBerry QNX.
JLR, which was bought by the Tata group in 2008, said last year that all its new cars would be available in electric or hybrid versions from 2020.
Britain’s biggest carmaker said in January it would open a software engineering center in Ireland to work on advanced automated driving and electrification technologies.


Libya’s National Oil against paying ‘ransom’ to reopen El Sharara field

Updated 14 December 2018
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Libya’s National Oil against paying ‘ransom’ to reopen El Sharara field

  • Ransom payment would set dangerous precedent
  • NOC declared force majeure on exports on Monday

BENGHAZI: Libya’s state-owned National Oil Corp. (NOC) said it was against paying a ransom to an armed group that has halted crude production at the country’s largest oilfield.
“Any attempt to pay a ransom to the armed militia which shut down El Sharara (oilfield) would set a dangerous precedent that would threaten the recovery of the Libyan economy,” NOC Chairman Mustafa Sanalla said in a statement on the company’s website.
NOC on Monday declared force majeure on exports from the 315,000-barrels-per-day oilfield after it was seized at the weekend by a local militia group.
The nearby El-Feel oilfield, which uses the same power supply as El Sharara, was still producing normally, a spokesman for NOC said, without giving an output figure. The field usually pumps around 70,000 bpd.
Since 2013 Libya has faced a wave of blockages of oilfields and export terminals by armed groups and civilians trying to press the country’s weak state into concessions.
Officials have tended to end such action by paying off protesters who demand to be added to the public payroll.
At El Sharara, in southern Libya, a mix of state-paid guards, civilians and tribesmen have occupied the field, camping there since Saturday, protesters and oil workers said. The protesters work in shifts, with some going home at night.
NOC has evacuated some staff by plane, engineers at the oilfield said. A number of sub-stations away from the main field have been vacated and equipment removed.
The occupiers are divided, with members of the Petroleum Facilities Guard (PFG) indicating they would end the blockade in return for a quick cash payment, oil workers say. The PFG has demanded more men be added to the public payroll.
The tribesmen have asked for long-term development funds, which might take time.
Libya is run by two competing, weak governments. Armed groups, tribesmen and normal Libyans tend to vent their anger about high inflation and a lack of infrastructure on the NOC, which they see as a cash cow booking billions of dollars in oil and gas revenues annually.