600 invited to Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s wedding

In this file photo, Britain’s Prince Harry, left, and Meghan Markle pose for the media at Kensington Palace in London. (AP)
Updated 22 March 2018
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600 invited to Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s wedding

LONDON: Some 600 people have been invited to the wedding of Britain’s Prince Harry and his fiancee Meghan Markle, Kensington Palace announced Thursday.
The invitations were posted earlier this week, Harry’s official residence said — without revealing who had made the guest list.
Harry and his US actress fiancee are set to tie the knot at Windsor Castle, west of London, on May 19.
The 600 invitees will attend the service in the castle’s St. George’s Chapel, followed by the lunchtime reception hosted by Harry’s grandmother Queen Elizabeth II at St. George’s Hall.
Later, around 200 guests are being invited to a private reception at Frogmore House given by Harry’s father Prince Charles, the heir to the throne.
The venue for the evening party, in the park outside Windsor Castle, is where Harry and Markle posed for their official engagement photos.
The invitations, issued in Charles’s name, were on thick white card gilded along the edge, which were die-stamped in gold and then burnished.
The invitations read: “His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales... requests the pleasure of the company of... at the marriage of His Royal Highness Prince Henry of Wales with Ms Meghan Markle at St. George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle on Saturday 19th May, 2018 at 12 Noon followed by a reception at Windsor Castle.”
The names of the invited guests were added in later by a calligraphy printer.
The invites indicated that the dress code is uniform, morning coat or lounge suit, or day dress with a hat.
Harry, a former soldier who also holds ceremonial military roles, is therefore likely to be wearing his highest-ranking uniform for the wedding.
The prince and his bride-to-be have been increasingly busy this month in the build-up to the big day.
On Tuesday, the couple announced they had chosen London-based US pastry chef Claire Ptak to make a lemon elderflower wedding cake, to be covered with buttercream and decorated with flowers.
Queen Elizabeth published her formal consent to the marriage on March 15.
By law, the monarch must give consent for the marriage of the first six people in line to inherit the throne.
Harry, 33, is fifth in line after his father Charles, brother Prince William and William’s children Prince George and Princess Charlotte.
He will be bumped down to sixth place when William’s wife Kate gives birth next month.
On March 12, Markle took part in her first official event with Queen Elizabeth, accompanying Harry to a Commonwealth Day service at London’s Westminster Abbey.
Markle, 36, was baptised by the leader of the Church of England earlier this month out of respect for the sovereign’s role as head of the denomination.
 


A hairy issue: Sailors tell the US Navy, ‘We want beards’

Updated 20 July 2018
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A hairy issue: Sailors tell the US Navy, ‘We want beards’

PROVIDENCE, Rhode Island: Now that women in the Navy can wear ponytails, men want beards.
The Navy said last week that servicewomen could sport ponytails, lock hairstyles, or ropelike strands, and wider hair buns, reversing a policy that long forbade females from letting their hair down.
Servicemen immediately chimed in on social media, asking the Navy if they could grow beards. A sailor’s Facebook post with a #WeWantBeards hashtag was shared thousands of times.
Beards were banned in 1984. The Navy wanted professional-looking sailors who could wear firefighting masks and breathing apparatuses without interference.
The Navy says that’s still the case. Still, some hope the change in female grooming standards opens the door.
Travis Rader, a 29-year-old naval physical security officer, said allowing beards would boost morale for men, just like allowing ponytails and locks has for women. There are two things that would make many Navy men happy: beards and better boots, he added.
Rader had a 6-inch-long beard when he joined the Navy after high school.
“You take something away from somebody, and they want it more,” said Rader, a master-at-arms assigned to Tinker Air Force Base in Oklahoma City.
The Navy announced it was adding grooming options for women during a Facebook Live event. Many black women had asked the Navy to be more inclusive of different hair textures. The Navy had the standards in place because of safety concerns and to ensure everyone maintained a uniform, professional look.
Rader was one of several sailors who wrote in the comments section of the Facebook Live event to press for beards. Bill Williams, a 20-year-old naval information systems technician, commented too, asking why sailors can’t have beards if bearded civilian firefighters wear masks.
Williams said he thinks a nice, well-groomed beard looks very professional.
“It’d be great because I know that when I shave for multiple days in a row, it starts to really hurt,” said Williams, who works at the Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station Hampton Roads in Virginia.
Sailors can get permission to grow a beard for religious reasons or if they have a skin condition that’s irritated by shaving. Mustaches are allowed as long as they are trimmed and neat.
“Handlebar mustaches, goatees, beards or eccentricities are not permitted,” the policy states. The Navy isn’t currently considering changing that.
Safety continues to be the primary concern, said Lt. J.G. Stuart Phillips, a spokesman for the chief of naval personnel. He referenced a 2016 study by the Naval Safety Center, which concluded that facial hair affects the proper fit and performance of respirators.