Huda Kattan turned down $185,000 for sponsored post

Huda Kattan (Shutterstock)
Updated 24 March 2018
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Huda Kattan turned down $185,000 for sponsored post

Iraqi-American beauty blogger and entrepreneur Huda Kattan has revealed that she once turned down the offer of a small fortune for a sponsored Instagram post.

In an interview with “Entrepreneur Middle East” published last week, Kattan claimed she had been offered $185,000 for a single Instagram post — she has 24.8 million followers on the social media platform — but turned it down because she did not want to include “#ad” in the caption.

“I know you have to identify it as an ad, but I just didn’t feel comfortable with it,” she said, without naming the brand in question, but saying she “genuinely loved the product.”

Kattan also revealed an unlikely ethical guide to her decision: Oprah Winfrey.

“I thought about Oprah,” she said. “I was like, ‘Would Oprah do that?’ No, she wouldn’t.”

The 34-year-old admitted it was a “painful” decision — not least because she had her eye on a new car — but said the fact her husband was able to support their family financially made her choice easier.

Authenticity is clearly important to Kattan. On Wednesday, she took to Instagram to raise her concerns about popular photo-editing app Facetune.

“This topic is pretty embarrassing for me to open up about but I feel it has to be done,” she wrote alongside a before-and-after Facetune shot and a video highlighting the differences between the two. “I started feeling like people were waaay too into Facetune (myself included), but we don’t need it as much as we think we do and I feel sometimes we go too far.”

Kattan said she wasn’t going to stop using the hugely popular app completely, but asked that the make-up industry, in particular, consider not using it so heavily and so often.


Exhibit highlights Wellington’s formative Indian years

A handout photograph recieved in London on March 25, 2019, shows the Deccan Dinner Service, a vast silver gilt service bought by Wellington's fellow officers in the Deccan region of India as a mark of their appreciation. (AFP)
Updated 26 March 2019
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Exhibit highlights Wellington’s formative Indian years

  • The “Young Wellington in India” exhibition runs from Saturday until November 3 at Apsley House, which remains the Wellesley family’s London home, on the edge of Hyde Park

LONDON: An exhibition on the Duke of Wellington’s time in India opens in London Saturday, shedding light on formative years before he defeated French emperor Napoleon Bonaparte at the Battle of Waterloo.
Between 1796 and 1804, as the young Arthur Wellesley, he helped overthrow the Tipu Sultan and masterminded victory in the Battle of Assaye.
A decade later he defeated Napoleon, paving the way for a century of relative peace in Europe and a time of vast British imperial expansion.
The collection includes a dinner service commemorating his leadership in India that was later supplemented with cutlery taken from Napoleon’s carriage.
It also includes books from the 200-volume traveling library that, aged 27, he took with him for the six-month voyage to India in a bid to broaden his education, having finished his studies early.
It included books on India’s history, politics and economics, Jonathan Swift’s “Gulliver’s Travels” and philosophical works.
The “Young Wellington in India” exhibition runs from Saturday until November 3 at Apsley House, which remains the Wellesley family’s London home, on the edge of Hyde Park.
Charles Wellesley, 73, the ninth and current Duke of Wellington, said his great-great-great grandfather’s time in India set the stage for defeating Napoleon.
“It was very, very formative... There is no doubt that he learnt a great deal in India,” he said on Monday.
“Napoleon underestimated Wellington and the reason for this exhibition is to show how important in Wellington’s life was his period in India.”
The exhibition features swords, paintings and the Deccan Dinner Service, a vast silver gilt service bought by Wellington’s fellow officers in the Deccan region of India as a mark of their appreciation.
The cutlery for the service was taken from Napoleon after Waterloo and carries his imperial crest.
The service is still used by the family.
Josephine Oxley, keeper of the Wellington Collection, said the India years were “a time when he learned to meld the military and the political, and became skilled at negotiations with the locals.
“It’s a really interesting period of his life.”