Nour Arida opens Hussein Bazaza fashion show in Beirut

Nour Arida is a hugely successful fashion blogger. (Shutterstock)
Updated 31 March 2018
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Nour Arida opens Hussein Bazaza fashion show in Beirut

DUBAI: American-Lebanese style icon Nour Arida opened the Hussein Bazaza FW18 runway show this week, showing off the up-and-coming designer’s creations to a packed out crowd in Beirut.
Arida, who is the hugely successful fashion blogger behind the brand N For Nour, took to the catwalk in a monochrome, sporty ensemble, complete with white ankle-length boots.
The social media star, who has a following of more than 270,000 on her Instagram account, closed the show in a surreal, almost Dali-like gown, which she paired with slicked-back hair and minimalistic make-up.

Yesterday - @husseinbazaza - photo cred @patricksawaya

A post shared by Nour Arida (@nouraridaofficial) on

Lebanese designer Hussien Bazaza is a favorite among the Middle East’s fashion insiders and is known for his whimsical, ethereal gowns.
Bazaza, who has dressed members of the Emirati and Qatari royal families and Arab superstars, was mentored by Elie Saab before he launched his own line in 2012 and shot to fame for his off-the-wall creations.
In March, Bazaza was selected as one of the region’s most influential personalities in the “Arab 30 under 30” list compiled by Forbes Middle East.
He also won the Best Emerging Designer award at The Middle East Fashion Awards in 2015 and has dressed celebrities and public figures such as Bollywood star Aishwarya Rai Bachchan, Queen Rania of Jordan and British supermodel Naomi Campbell.
His latest collection features flowing gowns with a sharp, almost punk edge. Pixelated heart icons and anime-style faces are imprinted on tops and oversized bags while plunging necklines, glitter coats and thigh-high red boots also make an appearance.


Blues artist Hindi Zahra pays tribute to her homeland

Updated 16 December 2018
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Blues artist Hindi Zahra pays tribute to her homeland

DUBAI: Moroccan singer Hindi Zahra recently bought her mesmerizing brand of music to the Louvre Abu Dhabi, where she performed as part of the Rain of Light festival on Friday.
Arab News caught up with the singer, who has been compared the likes of Ella Fitzgerald and Patti Smith, before the show to find out more about her foot-tapping style of music and the album that her performances are based on, “Homeland.”
The Paris-based musician pays tribute to her home country of Morocco in the album, which features a mix of English and Amazigh-language tracks.
“It is the country that gave me everything,” the artist, whose stage name is simply her real name inverted, told Arab News.
“It gave me… mixed culture — African culture, Mediterranean culture. My openness toward other cultures comes from my Moroccan roots,” she added.
Hindi was raised on a steady diet of jazz, rock and blues, which she said her uncles collected due to a familial interest in international music.
That could be part of the reason why she is so comfortable performing in multiple languages.
“I am comfortable with both (English and Amazigh), but because I… grew up with a lot of Afro-American music, it was really natural for me to improvise in English.”
In addition to a clear appreciation and understanding of Western jazz and rock music, Hindi spoke fondly about a legendary Egyptian artist whom she said has inspired her.
Abdel Halim Hafez, who worked during the country’s golden age of entertainment between the 1950s to 70s, played an important role in shaping Hindi’s own style.
“I love the way he delivered feelings through music,” she said of the late opera singer who died in 1977.
Imbued with an appreciation for a wide range of international styles, Hindi released her first album when she was 30 years old — even though she says she was ready 10 years earlier.
She waited a decade so she could produce music on her own terms, under her own label, she said.
“I am shocked about the condition of women in the industry, so it was very important for me to be free and to own my music so nobody owns me.”
After all this, her only hope when it comes to performing is “that (the audience) will dance,” she said.
“If I see them enjoying (the) music to the point that they dance, this is the most important.”