Huffington Post shuts down its Arabic news website

The Huffington Post have decided to shut down its Arabic edition. (Screenshot)
Updated 01 April 2018
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Huffington Post shuts down its Arabic news website

CAIRO: The Huffington Post have decided to shut down its Arabic edition, HuffPost Arabi, after three years of operation.
The Huffington Post Media Group said the step came in line with a mutual decision with its partner Integral Media Strategies.
A message on the website’s main page said: “HuffPost Arabi will no longer be publishing content as of March 30.” Instead, it directed readers to the mother website Huffpost.com or asked them to check out a new online portal named “Arabi Post.”
Huffington Post partnered with Wadah Khanfar, the former CEO of Al Jazeera Media Network, to launch its Arabic edition in 2015.
The platform was dedicated for covering news across the Arab World, but was often criticized for its controversial content deemed inconsistent with the liberal American news brand.
The website was already inaccessible in some Arab countries over alleged affiliations with the now-banned Muslim Brotherhood group.


Egypt reported to have 4-6m fake news pages

An Egyptian carries a load of newspapers in Cairo, Egypt, in this file photo taken on Dec. 1, 2014. (AP)
Updated 16 June 2019
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Egypt reported to have 4-6m fake news pages

  • ‘The fake accounts ... are usually not owned by Egyptians, but by foreigners’

CAIRO: Egypt is reported to have 4 to 6 million fake news pages on social media accounts, according to Ali Hosni, undersecretary at of the General Directorate of Information and Relations at the Egyptian Interior Ministry.
The fake accounts, made to spread false information, are usually not owned by Egyptians, but by foreigners, he added.
Egypt has faced a flood of false rumors on an almost weekly basis, with claims such as that a newly appointed minister was in fact dead, or that of a girl kidnapped in the Beheira, who turned out to have runaway to avoid taking her exams.
According to a recent global survey, 86 percent of internet users have admitted that they have fallen for fake news online. The survey also showed that Egyptians were the most gullible in terms of fake news.

Prohibitory step
The government passed a law prohibiting fake news in an attempt to control the problem. The law, passed in July 2018, states that social media accounts with over 5,000 followers will be treated as media outlets, and their owners could be subjected to fines or prison for spreading fake news.
Responses to the law were skeptical, as people wondered what defined fake news, while others found the law to be vague. With the global survey’s results, it can be presumed that the 2018 fake news law did not have too much of an impact.
There have been multiple reports of social media accounts masquerading as officials and in Egypt turning out to be fake. One, the page for Education Minister Mahmoud Abo Nasr, had 80,000 Facebook followers on it — his genuine official page had only 55,000 followers.