UAE’s ADNOC to introduce free self-service or pay for help options at petrol pumps

Cars are seen an ADNOC petrol station in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates July 10, 2017. (Reuters)
Updated 05 April 2018
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UAE’s ADNOC to introduce free self-service or pay for help options at petrol pumps

DUBAI: Motorists in the UAE will soon face charges if an attendant fills up their vehicle’s fuel tank under new service plans announced by oil giant ADNOC Distribution.
But customers can avoid paying the fee if they fill up their own tanks, the Abu Dhabi state-owned company said.
Officials working on the project told Arab News on Thursday that the drive behind the initiative was to give customers “more options.”
Service stations in Abu Dhabi will implement the plans in mid-April while other ADNOC stations throughout the UAE will be offering the premium and self-serving options in the following months.  
Details of the premium fuel service fee have not yet been released.
In 2015 Dubai’s fuel retailers ENOC and EPPCO reversed their decision to offer self-service at fuel pumps through the night just one month after its implementation.
 


Girls sport their ancestors’ hair for Lunar New year in China

Updated 4 min 46 sec ago
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Girls sport their ancestors’ hair for Lunar New year in China

  • The headpieces are inherited and used in a number of occasions
  • They are made from wool, string and the of ancestors, all wrapped around animals horns using white fabric

LONGJIA, China: Girls with large headpieces made from the hair of their ancestors and wearing intricately patterned dresses danced in isolated villages in southwest China to celebrate the Lunar New Year.
Against a stunning mountain backdrop, dozens of girls and women of the Long Horn Miao ethnicity performed for the annual flower festival or ‘Tiaohuajie’, held in Guizhou province on Thursday.
Onlookers watched — smartphones in hand — as the women swirled across a meadow, wearing dresses and jackets embroidered with pink roses and geometric patterns.
But it was the towering black headdresses of the dancers that really stood out — made from wool, string and the hair of their ancestors, and wrapped around animal horns with white fabric.
“It’s really special to be at the center of attention like this. I feel quite proud,” said Yang Yunzheng, 16.
“We organize this festival once a year when we wear these headpieces. That doesn’t change with modernization.”
The Miao ethnic minority is made up of some nine million people, mostly found in China’s southwest. Of those, around 5,000 “Long Horn Miao” live in just a dozen isolated villages in Guizhou.
Their headpieces are passed down through generations and worn on a number of occasions to honor their ancestors and preserve their traditions.
The festival is held on the 10th day of the Lunar New Year.