Indonesian minister calls for ‘social media detox’

A man plays with his mobile phone in front of a cellular provider’s advertisement with a Facebook logo in Jakarta. File/AFP
Updated 08 April 2018
0

Indonesian minister calls for ‘social media detox’

JAKARTA: Indonesia’s Minister of Communications and Information Technology, Rudiantara, has called for a social media detox following Facebook’s revelation that the personal data of more than a million Indonesian users may have been improperly accessed.
“I call on Indonesians to temporarily fast from using social media. If they really have to use it, please be really careful when sharing personal data,” Rudiantara told Arab News in a telephone interview on Saturday.
Rudiantara said he contacted Facebook representatives in Indonesia two weeks ago and gave them a verbal warning over the possible data breach when initial reports of Cambridge Analytica scandal emerged.
After Facebook disclosed in a blog post on Wednesday that a large number of Indonesian users’ data had been shared with Cambridge Analytica, Rudiantara summoned company representatives for a meeting on Thursday and gave them a warning letter.
“We asked them to provide us with their audit results to see how personal information of Indonesian users have been used. We also asked Facebook to block third-party applications from accessing Indonesian users’ personal data,” he said.
Facebook Chief Technology Officer Mike Schroepfer wrote in the blog post that the firm believes information from up to 87 million users worldwide may have been improperly shared.
According to the chart in the post, Indonesia, the Philippines and Vietnam are among the top 10 countries whose citizens’ personal data may have been harvested for Cambridge Analytica’s inappropriate use.
The chart shows that data of 1.75 million users in the Philippines, which is second to US users, could have been leaked, followed by Indonesia with more than a million users. In Vietnam, ranked ninth in the chart, about 427,000 users are believed to have been affected.
Rudiantara said he had asked police to probe alleged violations of electronic information and transactions law on the misuse of Indonesia users’ data. If Facebook is found guilty of violations, its representatives in Indonesia could face a maximum 12 years in prison and a fine of up to 12 billion Indonesian rupiah ($870,000).
In an emailed response to questions from Arab News, Facebook said it was committed to protecting people’s information, and plans to make privacy controls and settings available in all countries. The firm said it had taken significant steps to make its privacy tools easier to find, restrict data access on Facebook, and make its terms and data policy clearer.
“Overall, we believe these changes will better protect people’s information, and we will keep our community updated as we make more changes. We will continue to work with privacy and information commissioners, and authorities, in Indonesia,” a Facebook spokesperson wrote.
Indonesians are among the world’s most active social media users.

A survey in October 2017 by the Indonesian Internet Service Providers Association and the Indonesian Telecommunications Society showed Facebook is the second most popular social media application on smartphones, used by 66.5 percent of respondents. Instagram, which is owned by Facebook, was most popular, with 82.6 percent of respondents.
The survey found 79 percent of respondents objected to having their personal data being transferred to another party without their consent. Almost all respondents said they acknowledged personal data shared online should be protected and that the government should draft legislation protecting personal data shared online.
Rudiantara said the data leak should prompt lawmakers to start deliberating a personal data protection bill. Data protection is currently covered by a 2016 ministerial decree.


Divided UN council heads to Sweden for farmhouse retreat

Updated 19 April 2018
0

Divided UN council heads to Sweden for farmhouse retreat

  • 15 ambassadors will join Secretary-General Antonio Guterres for the secluded getaway in a country setting.
  • The three-day retreat will begin on Friday.

United Nations, United States: After a week of bitter acrimony over Syria, UN Security Council ambassadors are heading to a farmhouse in southern Sweden for a retreat to try to break the deadlock over how to end the war.
US Ambassador Nikki Haley and her Russian counterpart Vassily Nebenzia will be among the 15 ambassadors joining Secretary-General Antonio Guterres for the secluded getaway in a country setting.
The three-day retreat beginning Friday comes after one of the council’s most divisive periods, with the United States and Russia split over the alleged chemical weapons attack in Douma that lead to military action by Washington and its allies against Syria.
The council met five times on Syria last week including on Tuesday when Russia vetoed a US-drafted resolution setting up a chemical weapons probe while two other proposed measures failed to pass.
The Russia-US rivalry prompted Guterres to declare that the Cold War was “back with a vengeance.”
Asked whether he expected awkward moments during the Swedish retreat, Nebenzia told reporters: “I will see how they feel about dealing with me after all that happened.”
“It’s not news to anyone that the council is divided on Syria,” said Sweden’s Deputy UN Ambassador Carl Skau. “There is some need for humility and patience at this moment.”
The council will be staying at Backakra, the summer residence of Dag Hammarskjold, who was the United Nations’ second secretary-general.
The residence located on the southern tip of Sweden, far from Stockholm, is a “fitting and inspiring venue” to reconnect with the power of diplomacy, said Skau.
“It’s a place to roll up our sleeves, take off our jackets and ties and come up with some real and meaningful ways forward,” he said.
The annual brainstorming session usually takes place in upstate New York, but Sweden, which is a non-permanent council member, offered to host this year’s gathering.
Guterres had told council members that the focus of the meeting would be his plan for a “surge of diplomacy” to address conflicts worldwide, but the council’s deadlock over Syria is emerging as the top priority.