The six most influential films from the Golden Age of Arab cinema

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“Doa al-Karawan” is an adaptation of acclaimed writer Taha Hussein’s 1934 novel.
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A still from "Al-Ard."
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A still from the movie "Al-Mummia."
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A scene from the comedy "Imm El-Arousa."
Updated 08 April 2018
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The six most influential films from the Golden Age of Arab cinema

  • Celebrate the heyday of Arab cinema with these timeless classics
  • From tragedies to comedies, these films are iconic and loved across the Arab world
DUBAI: Our pick of the most influential films from the Golden Age of Arab cinema will help you decide what classic movie you are going to watch this week. So grab your popcorn, turn off your phone and take your pick.
“Doa Al-Karawan”
(The Nightingale’s Prayer)
The prolific Henry Barakat directs this adaptation of acclaimed writer Taha Hussein’s 1934 novel. The compelling, claustrophobic tale follows illiterate housekeeper Amna (Faten Hamama) as she tries to get revenge on ‘The Engineer’ (Ahmad Mazhar) who has seduced her sister and ruined her reputation.
“Al-Ard”
(The Land)
This 1969 adaptation of Abdel Rahman Al-Sharqawi’s novel, directed by Youseff Chahin, follows the struggle of a rural village in the 1930s against local authorities who are set to reduce its already meager water supply. A hard-hitting early examination of people-power that still resonates today.
“Nahr El-Hub”
(The River of Love)
Ezzel Dine Zulficar’s 1961 adaptation of “Anna Karenina” features the ‘First Couple’ of Egyptian cinema — Omar Sharif and Faten Hamama — in their last film together before their divorce. Hamama plays country girl Nawal, who is married off to a wealthy aristocrat but falls for army officer Khaled (Sharif). The couple’s real-life chemistry gives the movie an extra charge.
“Imm El-Arousa”
(Mother of the Bride)
Atef Salem’s 1964 comedy classic stars legendary Egyptian actors Tahiya Karioka and Emad Hamdi as Zeinab and Hussein — hardworking parents struggling to raise seven kids while arranging their eldest daughter’s upcoming wedding. And finding inventive ways to raise the necessary funds.
“Al-Mummia”
(The Mummy)
Ranked among Egyptian cinema’s greatest films, Shadi Abdel Salam’s 1969 movie is loosely based on the true story of the Abd El-Rasuls, a clan of grave robbers and black-market traders. It’s a thoughtful reflection on Egyptian identity which — like many on this list — hints at the tensions between rural and urban life.
“Khally Ballak Min ZouZou”
(Watch Out For ZouZou)
Starring Egyptian cinema icons Soad Hosny, Hussein Fahmy and Taheya Cariocca, Hassan Al Imam’s 1972 film — a perennial favorite in Egyptian households — tells the story of a college professor who falls in lust with a student. His fiancée decides to expose said student’s “shameful secret” — she was a dancer! — in an attempt to ruin her. Al Imam explored the friction between Egypt’s modernist urges and its conservative traditions.


K-pop fans call for a BTS show in the UAE

The hashtag #UAEwantsBTS kicked off in the UAE. (AFP)
Updated 17 July 2019
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K-pop fans call for a BTS show in the UAE

DUBAI: Fans of K-pop band BTS have taken to Twitter to call on the superstars to perform in the UAE.

This was after the singers confirmed on Sunday that they will be performing in Saudi Arabia for the first time in October, just days after another K-pop group debuted in the Kingdom.

The hashtag #UAEwantsBTS kicked off in the UAE, started by fans who hope to get the band to perform in the country.

The tweets even caught the attention of the Middle East’s largest multi-purpose indoor showground, the Coca-Cola Arena.The arena’s twitter account posted: “We’ve received all your requests and trust us, we want #kpopinuae too! Your enthusiasm continues to inspire us and we’re working to bring the best to Coca-Cola Arena!”

The members, with three albums ranked among the best 200 in the US, previously performed at KCON Abu Dhabi in 2016.