Nearly 50 Indonesians dead in April from bootleg liquor

Indonesian police remove bottles of illegal alcohol from a house in Cicalengka district in West Java province on April 8, 2018. (AFP)
Updated 09 April 2018
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Nearly 50 Indonesians dead in April from bootleg liquor

JAKARTA, Indonesia: Nearly 50 people have died after drinking bootleg liquor in western Indonesia including the capital Jakarta in little more than a week.
In the latest incident, 17 people died between Thursday and early Monday in Cicalengka subdistrict near the West Java capital of Bandung.
Head of the state-run hospital in Cicalengka, Yani Sumpena, said Monday that 16 died at the hospital and one was dead on arrival.
Jakarta police spokesman Argo Yuwono said another 31 people have died in Jakarta and its satellite cities of Depok and Bekasi in separate incidents since the beginning of the month.
High taxes on alcohol have spawned a black market for booze among the poor in Indonesia, the world most populous Muslim nation. Potentially lethal ingredients including methanol are sometimes used in bootleg recipes.


Hungary to quit UN migration pact shunned by Washington

Updated 34 min 15 sec ago
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Hungary to quit UN migration pact shunned by Washington

BUDAPEST: Hungary will quit a UN migration pact before its final approval, it said on Wednesday, calling the agreement a “threat to the world.”
The Global Compact For Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration was approved on Friday by all 193 UN member nations except the United States, which pulled out last year.
But Hungary, led by right-wing nationalist Prime Minister Viktor Orban, has decided not to sign the final document at a ceremony in December.
“This document is entirely against Hungary’s security interests,” Foreign Minister Peter Szijjarto told a news conference, adding: “This pact poses a threat to the world from the aspect that it could inspire millions (of migrants).”
Hungary, along with Poland and Czech Republic, has taken a tough stand against the admission of migrants, putting it at odds with the European Union, but striking a chord with voters by arguing that irregular immigration threatens European stability, and fencing off Hungary’s southern borders.
Szijjarto said the UN pact was “extreme, biased and facilitates migration.
“Its main premise is that migration is a good and inevitable phenomenon ... We consider migration a bad process, which has extremely serious security implications.”
Szijjarto said Hungary’s proposals were brushed aside during the debate of the document, which he said mostly favored the interests of African and Latin American countries, from where migration is more likely to originate.