Nearly half of people living in Saudi Arabia do not save anything, survey finds

Updated 13 April 2018
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Nearly half of people living in Saudi Arabia do not save anything, survey finds

  • Nearly half of all people living in Saudi Arabia have no savings
  • Just 17% of people in the Kingdom have saved less than 5% of their income

JEDDAH: Some 45 per cent of people living in Saudi Arabia do not save any money at all out of their monthly income, according to a new survey of attitudes towards saving and investment among residents in the Kingdom.

The survey, conducted by the Jeddah based wealth management firm SEDCO Holdings and Dubai-based online finance group Souqamal.com, found that most respondents blamed a low level of income for their failure to put money aside.

It also found that only a further 17 percent saved less than 5 percent, while 38 percent saved more than 6 percent.

The results come as the Ministry of Housing is asking Saudis to save for a deposit on their future home. It finds a lack of a savings culture that makes this goal difficult.

Amr Banaja, a SEDCO executive, said: “Anyone should be able to achieve what they aspire for financial without resorting to borrowing or depriving themselves of what they desire. One can do this by properly managing their finances, shunning needless expense, and choosing appropriate saving and investment opportunities.”

When asked about the reason behind their failure to respond, 60 percent said their level of income prevented it. Since 2014, official statistics show that the average levels of income have risen by 13 percent in the private sector, and 6 percent in government employment, the survey compilers said.

The survey raises the question of whether the cost of living in the Kingdom has risen faster than salaries. According to official figures inflation rose by 7.6 percent between 2014 and 2016. It fell to near zero last year, but jumped again at the beginning of this year, with the introduction of value added tax.

The last official figures showed consumer prices rose 2.7 percent in February, marginally down from the 3 percent of January.

The survey also found that 83 percent of respondents have no long term investment plans, showing a lack of awareness of investment techniques and practices.

Ambareen Musa, founder and CEO of Souqamal, said: “Saving and investment should go hand in hand. Start with a monthly budget and figure out what your basic necessities are that you can save every month.”

SEDCO has launched the Riyali financial literacy program to make people aware of the basics of investment.

The survey was conducted among 2,000 respondents, which included Saudi citizens and expatriates, in line with the Kingdom’s demographics.


Full-blown US, China trade war to cost jobs, growth and stability — WTO’s Azevedo

Updated 25 September 2018
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Full-blown US, China trade war to cost jobs, growth and stability — WTO’s Azevedo

  • ‘A continued escalation of tensions would pose an increased threat to stability, to jobs and to the kind of growth that we are seeing today’
  • ‘There would be no winners from such a scenario and every region would be affected’

BERLIN: A full-blown trade war would have serious effects on global economic growth and there would be no winners of such a scenario, the director-general of the World Trade Organization (WTO), Roberto Azevedo, said on Tuesday.
Speaking at a Berlin industry event against the backdrop of growing trade tensions between China and the US, Azevedo said: “The warning lights are flashing. A continued escalation of tensions would pose an increased threat to stability, to jobs and to the kind of growth that we are seeing today.”
A full-blown global trade war with a breakdown in international trade cooperation would reduce global trade growth by around 70 percent and GDP growth by 1.9 percent, Azevedo said.
“There would be no winners from such a scenario and every region would be affected,” Azevedo said. The European Union itself would have about 1.7 percent taken off its GDP growth, he said, adding: “Clearly, we cannot let this happen.”
Azevedo pointed to several reform proposals that addressed trade-distorting practices and the WTO’s existing mechanisms to resolve trade disputes, adding that members had to agree on which reforms they wanted to focus on.
“Clearly, this informed debate is gaining significant momentum and that is positive,” Azevedo said, adding the G20 summit in Buenos Aires in November would be crucial to agree on the next steps to safeguard the rules-based free trade order.
“Of course, the system can be better, in fact it must be better. But it’s nonetheless vital. So while we work to improve it and ensure that it’s more responsible to evolving economic needs, we must also preserve what we have — and I count on your support to that end,” he said.