What We Are Eating Today: Off the Champs Elysées, this branch of Le Relais de L’Entrecote is a Parisian institution

Updated 13 April 2018
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What We Are Eating Today: Off the Champs Elysées, this branch of Le Relais de L’Entrecote is a Parisian institution

  • The business was founded in 1959 by Paul Gineste de Saurs and the third generation of the family is poised to take over
  • Customers are prepared to queue up for an hour or more for a table

If you’re browsing the internet in search of good restaurants in Paris, you’re likely to see Le Relais de L’Entrecote popping up again and again. The menu is, to say the least, limited; In fact there isn’t one. The choice is steak and fries with salad and that’s it.

 Although part of a chain, the branch off the Champs Elysées is a Parisian institution. Customers are prepared to queue up for an hour or more for a table.Indeed, the restaurant is credited with teaching the French HOW to queue. The waitresses (no waiters) wear old-style black uniforms with crisp white collars and aprons and are all on the matronly side, which adds to the general air of cosiness;It’s like being served by your mum. 

If the portions seem small, worry not because second helpings are dished out the moment anyone spots an empty plate.

The business was founded in 1959 by Paul Gineste de Saurs and the third generation of the family is poised to take over. Steaks are served in a special sauce. Made with chicken livers,shallots, butter,cream,mustard, thyme, tarragon and parsley, the recipe remained secret  until 2014. 

Bon appetit!


What We Are Reading Today: ‘Less,’ by Andrew Sean Greer

Updated 27 min 24 sec ago
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What We Are Reading Today: ‘Less,’ by Andrew Sean Greer

“Less” won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction last week and was a surprising choice because few comic novels have won the prestigious award.

The judges’ citation describes it as “a generous book, musical in its prose and expansive in its structure and range, about growing older and the essential nature of love.”

The book follows Arthur Less, a failed novelist about to turn 50.

When he receives a wedding invitation from his boyfriend of nine years ago, he decides instead to run away from his problems by attending a few half-baked literary events around the world.

He will almost fall in love in Paris, almost fall to his death in Berlin, barely escape to a Moroccan ski chalet from a Saharan sandstorm, accidentally book himself in as a writer-in-residence at a Christian retreat center in Southern India, and have a chance encounter on a desert island in the Arabian Sea.

Andrew Sean Greer began this comic masterpiece as a very serious novel about being gay and aging.

“But after a year, I just couldn’t do it,” he told The Washington Post. “It sounds strange but what I was writing about was so sad to me that I thought the only way to write about this was to make it a funny story.”