Two media centers and 618 journalists to cover Arab Summit in Dhahran

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The Minister of Culture and Information visits the Media Center in Ithra and Mercure to check on media coverage. (SPA)
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The Minister of Culture and Information visits the Media Center in Ithra and Mercure to check on media coverage. (SPA)
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The media center at Ithra. (SPA)
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Inside the media center at Hotel Mercure. (SPA)
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Inside the media center at Ithra. (SPA)
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Inside the media center at Ithra. (SPA)
Updated 14 April 2018
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Two media centers and 618 journalists to cover Arab Summit in Dhahran

  • 423 reporters from international news agencies accredited to cover 29th Arab Summit
  • 25 young Saudis at 2 media centers to assist more than 600 journalists

DHAHRAN: The Ministry of Culture and Information has set up two media centers to cover the 29th Arab Summit, which opens on Sunday in the city of Dhahran.
One of the centers is in the Hotel Mercure in Alkhobar, while the second is in the King Abdulaziz Center for World Culture in Dhahran.
Culture and Information Minister Awwad Al-Awwad on Saturday visited the media center in the Hotel Mercure in Dhahran to check preparations set by the ministry for the coverage of the summit.
The center is managed by 25 young Saudis, and provides support and assistance to more than 600 journalists.
The journalists include 423 reporters from outside the Kingdom, representing the most significant Arab, Islamic and international news agencies and channels.
Khaled Mataen, the ministry’s director of media and public relations with foreign media, said: “The ministry has equipped the centers with the latest equipment. They include computers, and a complete Internet network that allows journalists to send their news and reports faster. They also include fax machines, international phone lines and studios for live coverage using satellites for all local and international channels.”
He said: “A group of young Saudis are managing the centers. They will be ready to offer any assistance the journalists may need from data, statistics and information. This would make their jobs easier either in the centers or on the field with tasks related to the summit coverage.”
Mataen said “their job also consists on keeping up with all news related to the summit on different news channels and on social media platforms and displaying them on a live screen for the journalists in the media centers.”
He said that “the number of registered journalists to cover the Arab summit has reached 618. Among those are journalists from international news agencies in addition to satellite channels reached through the Ministry’s Government Communication Center and International Communication Center.”
Algerian journalist Kareem Ali Loch said he was happy to be covering the summit.
He commended the ministry’s efforts to help journalists covering the event.
Turkish state television journalist Talib Abdullah Oglo praised the media service and equipment provided in the media centers.
He also thanked the organizers for the facilities and their welcoming reception.
Al-Awwad inspected the summit’s interactive statistics charts that show the number of journalists taking part in its coverage.


Twitter blocks accounts of Iranian state media outlets

Updated 21 July 2019
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Twitter blocks accounts of Iranian state media outlets

  • Twitter said the accounts harassed people linked to the Baha’i faith
  • The Baha’i faith is a religious minority that has long faced persecution in Iran

WASHINGTON: A day after Twitter suspended the accounts of several Iranian state media outlets, the social networking service said Saturday it acted after harassment of people linked to the Baha’i faith.
Amid soaring tensions in the region, heightened by Iran’s seizure on Friday of a British-flagged tanker, some of the affected media outlets had speculated that the suspensions were related to their coverage of the seizure.
But Twitter cited what it said was the coordinated and targeted harassment of people linked to the Baha’i faith, a religious minority that has long faced persecution in Iran.
It did not name the suspended accounts, and said it was continuing to investigate the matter.
“Account suspended. Twitter suspends accounts which violate the Twitter Rules,” read English-language messages on each of the Iranian media outlets’ accounts.
Mehr news agency, which is close to moderate conservatives in Iran, said its Farsi-language account appeared to have been blocked late Friday following its reports on the seizure of the tanker Stena Impero in the strategic Strait of Hormuz.
Iran’s Revolutionary Guard said it seized the Swedish-owned tanker for breaking “international maritime rules” in the strait, a chokepoint for around a third of the world’s sea-borne oil.
Mehr’s Farsi-language Twitter page was inaccessible on Saturday, along with those of the official IRNA news agency and the agency of the Young Journalists’ Club.
“Since last night and after seizure of a British tanker in the Strait of Hormuz the account of the Young Journalists’ Club and some other users have been suspended,” the YJC said on its website.
Mehr noted that its Mehr Diplomacy account, which publishes analysis and interviews on foreign policy, was also offline.
Another account taken down belonged to Ali Akbar Raefipoor, a hard-line public speaker.
None of the owners of the suspended accounts said they had been given any reason for the move by Twitter.
The micro-blogging platform is banned in Iran, but many officials still have accounts and people access them by using a virtual private network, or VPN, to bypass censorship.