WAGS of Saudi Pro League football stars steal the show as Al-Hilal FC wins top title

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The partners of Al-Hilal midfield Nicolás Milesi and forward Ezequiel Cerutti arrive at the King Fahd Stadium in Riyadh during the Al-Hilal and Al-Fateh match.
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The partner of Ezequiel Cerutti.
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Nicolas Milesi's wife and child.
Updated 15 April 2018
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WAGS of Saudi Pro League football stars steal the show as Al-Hilal FC wins top title

  • Saudi government in January enabled women to attend football matches

RIYADH: The wives and girlfriends of the Al-Hilal players added some glamor to the occasion when the Riyadh giants won the Saudi Pro League title.

The fiancèe of star midfield Nicolás Milesi and the wife of big-money forward Ezequiel Cerutti were among the crowd of 23,000 at the King Fahd Stadium in Riyadh as Al-Hilal beat Al-Fateh 4-1.  

Dressed conservatively, they were benefiting from the ruling issued by the Saudi government in January that enabled women to attend football matches for the first time.

Milesi, the 25-year-old Uruguayan, has been at Al-Hilal since 2016 while Cerutti, his countryman, joined the club in January in a £4 million move from San Lorenzo.  

The South American pair were both part of the side who clinched the Saudi Pro League title for the club for the 15th time on a night of big celebrations in the capital city.

Omar Khribin, was the hero for Al-Hilal, scoring a hat-trick. 


What We Are Reading Today: ‘Less,’ by Andrew Sean Greer

Updated 34 min 32 sec ago
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What We Are Reading Today: ‘Less,’ by Andrew Sean Greer

“Less” won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction last week and was a surprising choice because few comic novels have won the prestigious award.

The judges’ citation describes it as “a generous book, musical in its prose and expansive in its structure and range, about growing older and the essential nature of love.”

The book follows Arthur Less, a failed novelist about to turn 50.

When he receives a wedding invitation from his boyfriend of nine years ago, he decides instead to run away from his problems by attending a few half-baked literary events around the world.

He will almost fall in love in Paris, almost fall to his death in Berlin, barely escape to a Moroccan ski chalet from a Saharan sandstorm, accidentally book himself in as a writer-in-residence at a Christian retreat center in Southern India, and have a chance encounter on a desert island in the Arabian Sea.

Andrew Sean Greer began this comic masterpiece as a very serious novel about being gay and aging.

“But after a year, I just couldn’t do it,” he told The Washington Post. “It sounds strange but what I was writing about was so sad to me that I thought the only way to write about this was to make it a funny story.”