Saffron Collins drops new single, “Green”

Updated 15 April 2018
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Saffron Collins drops new single, “Green”

Dubai-based British singer-songwriter Saffron Collins released her latest single, “Green,” this weekend. The track is a result of the 17-year-old’s recent trip to Red Bull Studios Auckland where she collaborated with New Zealand musician-producer High Hoops (Jordan Arts) on two songs, including “Green.”

The acoustic track is set to a double-time jazz beat created by Arts, over which Collins played guitar and bass. Collins describes the sound as “like an Eighties disco track” and told Red Bull she wrote it about her previous school, where she “never really fit in.”

In a behind-the-scenes video, also released on Friday, Arts described their collaboration as a “crazy combination of fuzzy, golden, fresh stuff.”

 


What We Are Reading Today: African Dominion  by Michael A. Gomez

Updated 25 September 2018
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What We Are Reading Today: African Dominion  by Michael A. Gomez

  • Michael Gomez unveils a new vision of how categories of ethnicity, race, gender, and caste emerged in Africa and in global history more generally
  • Islam’s growth in West Africa resulted in a series of political experiments unique to the region

Pick up almost any book on early and medieval world history and empire, and where do you find West Africa? On the periphery. This pioneering book, the first on this period of the region’s history in a generation, tells a different story. 

Interweaving political and social history and drawing on a rich array of sources, including Arabic manuscripts, oral histories, and recent archaeological findings, Michael Gomez unveils a new vision of how categories of ethnicity, race, gender, and caste emerged in Africa and in global history more generally. Scholars have long held that such distinctions arose during the colonial period, but Gomez shows they developed much earlier.

Focusing on the Savannah and Sahel region, Gomez traces the exchange of ideas and influences with North Africa and the Central Islamic Lands by way of merchants, scholars, and pilgrims. 

Islam’s growth in West Africa resulted in a series of political experiments unique to the region, culminating in the rise of empire. A major preoccupation was the question of who could be legally enslaved, which together with other factors led to the construction of new ideas about ethnicity, race, gender, and caste — long before colonialism and the transatlantic slave trade.

Telling a radically new story about early Africa in global history, African Dominion is set to be the standard work on the subject for many years to come.