Australia shark attack: mauled surfer swims to shore despite leg injuries

A rescue helicopter and other emergency vehicles at the scene of the shark attack in Gracetown, Australia. The 30-year old surfer was treated on the beach by paramedics before he was flown by helicopter 250 kilometers to a hospital in the city of Perth. (Australian Broadcasting Corp via AP)
Updated 16 April 2018
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Australia shark attack: mauled surfer swims to shore despite leg injuries

PERTH, Australia: A surfer mauled by a shark Monday off southwest Australia managed to swim to shore despite serious injuries to both of his legs, an official and a witness said.
The man was surfing at Gracetown around 8am when he was attacked, St. John Ambulance spokesman Dennis Bertoldo said. He was treated on the beach by paramedics before he was flown by helicopter 250 kilometers to a hospital in the city of Perth, Bertoldo said.
The hospital described the victim’s condition as stable. He is in his 30s.
The attack prompted the World Surf League to postpone the nearby Margaret River Pro international surfing contest.
Surf photographer Peter Jovic watched the attack from the beach and likened it to the live broadcast of a shark attack in South Africa in 2015. Former champion surfer Mick Fanning escaped unscathed when a great white attacked his board as he waited to catch a wave.
“If anyone is familiar with the Mick Fanning moment ... it was very similar to that, where a shark pretty much popped up and ended up knocking a surfer off his board,” Jovic told Australian Broadcasting Corp. radio.
“The surfer who was being attacked ended up miraculously body surfing into a little wave and getting pushed in by a local at the same time, who was out there with him, and making it to shore before everyone came to his aid,” Jovic added.
Lifeguards said a 4-meter shark was spotted off a nearby beach two hours after the attack.
A surfer was killed by a shark at Gracetown in 2013.


Hundreds of migrants storm Spanish enclave in North Africa, one dies

Updated 21 October 2018
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Hundreds of migrants storm Spanish enclave in North Africa, one dies

  • About 200 migrants managed to scale the seven-meter high metal barrier and were taken to a reception center in Melilla
  • The man died of a suspected cardio-respiratory arrest despite being treated by emergency services

MADRID: One African migrant died and three others were injured when around 300 stormed the border fence separating Spanish enclave Melilla from Morocco on Sunday, the local authorities said.
About 200 migrants managed to scale the seven-meter high metal barrier and were taken to a reception center in Melilla where officials started the process of identifying them.
The man died of a suspected cardio-respiratory arrest despite being treated by emergency services, the Spanish government’s local delegation said in a statement.
More than 6,000 migrants have made it to Melilla and Spain’s nearby territory Ceuta so far this year, according to the UN refugee agency UNHCR. In some places, the fences around the enclaves are topped with razor wire.
On Sunday, wooden-handled hooks and shoes fitted with spikes to help the climb were left behind, along with a bloodied t-shirt.
More than 40,000 have arrived by sea on Andalucia’s southern coast since January, making Spain Europe’s top destination for migrants which the European Union has failed to agree on how to handle.
The routes have changed as Italy clamped down on rescue ships to dock at its ports, and a deal between the EU and Turkey eased flows across the Aegean Sea to Greece.
The vast majority of arrivals in Spain are men, primarily from Guinea, Mali and Morocco, the UNHCR says.
On Saturday, Spain returned to Morocco 24 migrants who reached the Chafarinas islands, another Spanish territory off the North African coast, under a bilateral agreement signed in 1992, under which citizens of third countries who have entered illegally can be returned within a certain time frame.
This agreement was very rarely used until this summer, when 116 men who stormed the Ceuta fence were turned back. Spain’s Interior Ministry says it is being used now thanks to good bilateral relations.