Archaeologists uncover silver treasure on German island

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An archaeologist holds an ancient Danish coin which was minted under King Harald Bluetooth after a medieval silver treasure had been found near Schaprdoe on the northern German island of Ruegen in the Baltic Sea. (Stefan Sauer/dpa via AP)
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Medieval Saxonian, Ottoman, Danish and Byzantine coins after a medieval silver treasure had been found near Schaprode on the northern German island of Ruegen in the Baltic Sea. (Stefan Sauer/dpa via AP)
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Medieval jewelry and coins are displayed on a table after a medieval silver treasure had been found near Schaprode on the northern German island of Ruegen in the Baltic Sea. (Stefan Sauer/dpa via AP)
Updated 16 April 2018
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Archaeologists uncover silver treasure on German island

BERLIN: Archaeologists on the German Baltic island of Ruegen have uncovered hundreds of 1,000-year-old silver coins, rings, pearls and bracelets that are linked to the era of the Danish King Harald Gormsson.
The German news agency dpa reported Monday a single coin was first found by two amateur archaeologists, one of them a 13-year-old boy, in a field near the village of Schaprode in January. The state’s archaeology office then became involved and the entire treasure was recovered by experts last weekend.
Archaeologists said that some 100 silver coins are probably from the reign of Harald Gormsson, better known as “Harry Bluetooth,” who lived in the tenth century and introduced Christianity to Denmark.
He was the king of what is now Denmark, northern Germany, southern Sweden and parts of Norway.


400-year-old shipwreck ‘discovery of decade’ for Portugal

Updated 53 min 57 sec ago
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400-year-old shipwreck ‘discovery of decade’ for Portugal

  • Freire and his team believe the ship was wrecked between 1575 and 1625, when Portugal’s spice trade with India was at its peak

CASCAIS, Portugal: Archaeologists searching Portugal’s coast have found a 400-year-old shipwreck believed to have sunk near Lisbon after returning from India laden with spices, specialists said on Monday.
“From a heritage perspective, this is the discovery of the decade,” project director Jorge Freire said. “In Portugal, this is the most important find of all time.”
In and around the shipwreck, 40 feet (12 meters) below the surface, divers found spices, nine bronze cannons engraved with the Portuguese coat of arms, Chinese ceramics and cowry shells, a type of currency used to trade slaves during the colonial era.
Found on Sept. 3 off the coast of Cascais, a resort town on the outskirts of Lisbon, the shipwreck and its objects were “very well-preserved,” said Freire.
Freire and his team believe the ship was wrecked between 1575 and 1625, when Portugal’s spice trade with India was at its peak.
In 1994, Portuguese ship Our Lady of the Martyrs was discovered near Fort of Sao Juliao da Barra, a military defense complex near Cascais.
“For a long time, specialists have considered the mouth of the Tagus river a hotspot for shipwrecks,” said Minister of Culture Luis Mendes. “This discovery came to prove it.”
The wreck was found as part of a 10-year-old archaeological project backed by the municipal council of Cascais, the navy, the Portuguese government and Nova University of Lisbon.