Egyptian photojournalist wins World Press Photo Award

Heba Khamis with one of her award-winning photographs from the ‘Banned Beauty’ project. (Courtesy @Heba_Khamis)
Updated 16 April 2018
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Egyptian photojournalist wins World Press Photo Award

  • Heba Khamis was granted the award for “Banned Beauty;” a photo series highlighting the practice of breast ironing in Cameron.
  • Photojournalist’s work concentrates on social issues that are often ignored.

Cairo: Heba Khamis became the first Egyptian photojournalist to win the World Press Photo Award.

The 29-year-old woman was granted the award for “Banned Beauty;” a photo series highlighting the practice of breast ironing in Cameroon. Her story won first prize in the contemporary issues category.

Her photos shed light on the Cameroonian practice of flattening the breasts of girls, aged eight to 12, using heated objects, in the belief that it will stop them from maturing, deter rape and delay sexual encounter.

From Amsterdam, Khamis took to Instagram to share a picture of herself with one of her award-winning photos.

She expressed her gratitude for receiving it, and dedicated it to her father, whom she said had passed away last year.

“It’s a dream for many photographers all over the world, but unfortunately each story has a dark side, on the same day last year exactly six hours from now I lost my father...” Khamis said in her speech for the World Press Photo Award.

“While I was traveling, and my passport was in another embassy preparing for another trip, I missed my chance to say goodbye to my father, to say I forgive you, please forgive me.”

“We live so much in other people’s moments, that we sometimes miss our own ...” she said.

Khamis graduated with a bachelors in painting before opting to pursue a career in photojournalism. Her work concentrates on social issues that are often ignored.


Archaeologists find bust of Roman emperor in Egypt dig in Aswan

Updated 23 April 2018
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Archaeologists find bust of Roman emperor in Egypt dig in Aswan

Cairo: Egypt says archaeologists have discovered a bust of the Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius in the southern city of Aswan.
The Antiquities Ministry said Sunday the head was found in the Temple of Kom Ombo during work to protect the site from groundwater.
It says archaeologists have also unearthed artifacts belongs to a shrine for the god Osiris-Ptah-Neb inside the ancient temple of Karnak in the city of Luxor.
It says the new discoveries include parts of a stone panel depicting a ram and a goose — symbols of the ancient Egyptian god Amun — on an offering table.
Egypt hopes such discoveries will spur tourism, which has suffered from political turmoil following the 2011 uprising.