Debenhams adds to UK retail gloom with new profit warning

A shopper walks past a Debenham's store in central London. The retailer has added to the gloom in the retail sector with a profits warning.
Updated 19 April 2018
0

Debenhams adds to UK retail gloom with new profit warning

  • First half underlying pretax profit down 52 percent
  • Finance chief quits for job at Selfridges

Department store group Debenhams added to the grim start to 2018 for Britain’s retail sector, lowering its full-year outlook for the second time in four months and cutting its dividend after a 52 percent slump in first half profit.
Shares in Debenhams fell as much as 13 percent on Thursday, taking its year-on-year plunge to 61 percent.
The 240-year old Debenhams, which delivered the sector’s first profit warning of the year in January, also said Matt Smith, its chief financial officer, was quitting to take up the same role at rival Selfridges.
Debenhams is not alone in finding the going tough. Official UK data showed the biggest quarterly fall in retail sales in a year.
Debenhams’ problems have, however, also been self-inflicted.
“We didn’t help ourselves at Christmas because our approach wasn’t good enough,” CEO Sergio Bucher told reporters. Debenhams said in January it had been forced to cut prices to drive sales of Christmas gifts.
Already this year Toys R Us UK, electricals group Maplin and drinks wholesaler Conviviality have plunged into administration, while fashion retailer New Look and floor coverings firm Carpetright are closing stores.
Rival department store group House of Fraser is seeking rent reductions while market leader John Lewis has cautioned on the outlook.
Bucher, a former Amazon and Inditex executive who joined Debenhams in 2016, is one year into a turnaround plan focused on closing some stores, downsizing or revamping others, cutting promotions and improving online service, while seeking cost savings.
Progress has been hampered by changing shopping habits, a squeeze on UK consumers’ budgets, a shift in spending away from fashion toward holidays and entertainment, as well as intense online competition and bad weather, including snow in March that temporarily shut almost 100 stores.
“The market has remained very volatile and competitive with consumer confidence and the clothing market continuing to fall,” said Bucher.
“The retail market is changing but this is happening faster than we or anybody expected and therefore we need to accelerate our pace of change,” he said.
Outgoing CFO Smith denied his exit showed a lack of confidence in Bucher’s plan. “I was part of developing the plan, it’s a good plan,” he said.
Bucher said progress had been made, pointing to strengthened management, sales growth from digital channels ahead of the market, encouraging returns from new store formats, and partnerships with other retailers.
“It’s not easy from the outside to appreciate the amount and magnitude of change that is happening inside Debenhams,” he said.
Debenhams made an underlying pretax profit of £42.2 million ($59.9 million) in the 26 weeks to March 3, below analysts’ average forecast of £44 million, on revenue down 1.6 percent to £1.65 billion. The interim dividend was cut by 51 percent to 0.5 pence to fund the recovery strategy.
The group is now forecasting a 2017-18 pretax profit at the lower end of analysts’ forecast range of £50-£61 million versus previous guidance of £55-£65 million. It made £95.2 million in 2016-17.
“Our biggest concern remains relevance, Debenhams has lost the customer as the product offer has become tired,” said analysts at Peel Hunt, reiterating their “sell” recommendation.
“The CFO is leaving for Selfridges, investors should follow,” they said.


Urgency needed to boost Palestinian economy: IMF chief

Updated 26 June 2019
0

Urgency needed to boost Palestinian economy: IMF chief

  • The MF has been warning of severe deterioration in the Palestinian economy
  • ‘If there is an economic plan, if there is urgency, it’s a question of making sure that the momentum is sustained’

MANAMA: IMF chief Christine Lagarde said Wednesday that major economic growth was possible in the Palestinian territories if all sides showed urgency, as she took part in a US-led conference boycotted by the Palestinian leadership.
The International Monetary Fund has been warning of severe deterioration in the Palestinian economy, with tax revenue blocked in a dispute with Israel which has also imposed a crippling blockade on the Gaza Strip for more than a decade.
“If there is an economic plan, if there is urgency, it’s a question of making sure that the momentum is sustained,” said Lagarde.
The IMF chief is attending a conference in Bahrain to discuss the economic aspects of a United States plan for Israeli-Palestinian peace, which has already been rejected by the Palestinians as it fails to address key political issues.
Lagarde said for the US plan to work “it will require all the goodwill in the world on the part of all parties — private sector, public sector, international organizations and the parties on the ground and their neighbors.”
Citing examples of post-conflict countries, Lagarde said that private investors needed progress in several sectors including strengthening the central bank, better managing public finance and mobilizing domestic revenue.
“If anti-corruption is really one of the imperatives of the authorities — as it was in Rwanda, for instance — then things can really take off,” she said.
The plan presented by White House adviser Jared Kushner calls for $50 billion of investment in the Palestinian territories and its neighbors within a decade.
The proposals for infrastructure, tourism, education and more aim to create one million Palestinian jobs.
Gross domestic product in the Gaza Strip declined by eight percent last year, while there was only minor growth in the West Bank.
Kushner, opening the conference on Tuesday, called the plan the “Opportunity of the Century” — and said the Palestinians needed to accept it before a deal can be reached on political solutions.
The Palestinian Authority has rejected the conference, saying that the US and Israel are trying to dangle money to impose their ideas on a political settlement.
Washington says it will unveil the political aspects of its peace deal at a later date, most likely after Israel’s September election.