How Arab News' new bureaus and digital editions are shaping the brand's news agenda 

Dubai is one of the bureaus that Arab News has opened during the publication's expansion.
Updated 20 April 2018
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How Arab News' new bureaus and digital editions are shaping the brand's news agenda 

  • The first Arab News bureaus to open outside of Saudi Arabia were in London, Southeast Asia and Dubai
  • Most regional stories have an international dimension and Arab News has expanded to reflect that

JEDDAH: “Arab” news, for better or for worse, is rarely solely confined to the region.

From the bloody conflict in Syria and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, to the investment moves made by the wealth funds of Saudi Arabia and the UAE, most regional stories have an international dimension — and this newspaper has expanded its global footprint to reflect that. 

Before September 2016, Arab News had no global bureaus or correspondents, nor did it have a vision for growing its international audience. 

Since that date, we have been creating new bureaus and recruiting new contributors regionally and internationally, as part of our “more digital, more global” strategy. This aims at attracting non-Arabic speakers across the world who are seeking specialist information about Saudi Arabia and the Arab world.

It means we can cover how the latest policy decision in Washington, a military move by Moscow, or a massive business investment from Beijing may impact the Arab world.

Just as decisions made on the global stage reverberate in the Middle East and North Africa, countries in the Arab world, notably Saudi Arabia, have ever closer ties with Western powers. Witness the ongoing visit by Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman to the US.

The first Arab News bureaus to open outside of our headquarters in Saudi Arabia were in London, Southeast Asia and Dubai.

Award-winning journalist Baker Atyani leads the Southeast Asia bureau, with contributors in Islamabad, New Delhi, Kabul, Manila and Jakarta. Major stories from that bureau include an interview with Pakistan’s Prime Minister Shahid Khaqan Abbasi.

Our global operations are complemented by the Dubai bureau, headed by Ross Anderson and the London bureau, run by Ben Flanagan. 

On top of this, Arab News also has foreign contributors across the globe, reporting to Jonathan Lessware, the newspaper’s foreign editor.

Of course, the Middle East remains a key area of interest to our editors and readers. Regional contributors include Daoud Kuttab in Amman, Hazem Balousha in Gaza City, Najia Houssari in Beirut, Suadad Al-Salhy in Baghdad and Menekse Tokyay in Ankara.

As global interest in the Arab world grows, so does our network of contributors and readership. We are connecting the world. 


Viacom buys television streaming service for $340 mn

VIacom
Updated 23 January 2019
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Viacom buys television streaming service for $340 mn

  • The Los Angeles-based company boasts more than 12 million active monthly users, most of them using televisions connected to the Internet

SAN FRANCISCO: US media group Viacom announced Tuesday a deal to buy free streaming television service Pluto TV for $340 million in cash to better compete as lifestyles shift to online entertainment.
Viacom properties include Comedy Central, MTV and Nickelodeon, as well as Paramount Pictures.
“Today marks an important step forward in Viacom’s evolution,” Viacom chief executive Bob Bakish said in a statement.
“As the video marketplace continues to segment, we see an opportunity to support the ecosystem in creating products at a broad range of price points, including free.”
Viacom is optimistic about the ad-supported streaming television market, where it plans to work with Pluto TV and a range of partners, according to Bakish.
Acquiring Pluto TV will advance Viacom strategic priorities, including “expanding its presence across next-generation distribution platforms and growing its advanced advertising business,” according to the New York-based media company.
Founded in 2013, Pluto TV streams more than 100 channels of ad-supported television on the Internet.
The Los Angeles-based company boasts more than 12 million active monthly users, most of them using televisions connected to the Internet.
Pluto streams content to screens through Roku, Amazon Fire TV, Android TV, Apple TV and Sony PlayStation video game consoles.
The media sector is being shaken up by technology companies such as Amazon, Netflix and YouTube that let people stream video on-demand rather that be tethered to costly cable or satellite services.
The competition for viewers has led to maneuvering in the sector, with AT&T buying Time Warner and Fox assets being acquired by Disney, which is launching a streaming service of its own.