China admits reporting two major quakes which never happened

A woman walks through a derelict section of the old town in Kashgar, Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region, China, in this March 23, 2017. China’s earthquake administration has admitted reporting two earthquakes that never happened, including one in Xinjiang. (REUTERS file photo)
Updated 20 April 2018
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China admits reporting two major quakes which never happened

  • Earthquake monitor reported that two 6.5 magnitude quakes happened just 10 seconds apart at opposite ends of the country on April 19, 2018
  • Administration says they were holding an emergency response exercise and mock quakes were accidentally leaked 

BEIJING: China’s earthquake administration said on Friday that it had accidentally reported two major quakes which in fact had never happened, saying they were drills which had been unintentionally released to the public.
Late on Thursday, the administration said on its website there had been two 6.5 magnitude quakes just 10 seconds apart at opposite ends of the country — in the far western region of Xinjiang and in the southwestern province of Yunnan.
The information stayed on its website for at least an hour, though did not appear on its microblog, which is how many people in China first learn of quakes.
In a statement on its website, the administration said they had in fact been holding an emergency response exercise.
“An accidental leak of the quake drill was picked up by the media and caused a misunderstanding,” it said. “After this happened, our administration immediately organized relevant departments to delete the inaccurate information.”
China is a seismically active country frequently hit by major earthquakes.
A decade ago a 7.9 magnitude quake rocked the southwestern province of Sichuan, killing almost 70,000 people.


 


Pakistani PM’s party wins less seats than expected in vote

Updated 3 min 2 sec ago
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Pakistani PM’s party wins less seats than expected in vote

ISLAMABAD: Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan’s party didn’t win as many seats as it expected in special elections held for 35 seats that remained up for grabs after July’s parliament elections.
The party of ex-premier Nawaz Sharif won 11 seats in the national and provincial seats, out of 35 contested in Sunday’s balloting. Khan’s candidates secured 15 seats. Other small parties won the rest.
The vote doesn’t change anything but is still a setback for Khan, who in July didn’t get an outright majority but had to form a coalition government.
Under Pakistani law, candidates can run for multiple seats and if they secure more than one seat in parliament or provincial assemblies, they have to give up all but one seat. Special elections are then held for the vacated seats.