Islam forbids incitement: Makkah Grand Mosque imam

Updated 21 April 2018
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Islam forbids incitement: Makkah Grand Mosque imam

  • He said that incitement was a satanic feature which led to corruption
  • He said that Islam forbids incitement and makes it equal to treason

MAKKAH: The imam of the Grand Mosque in Makkah, Sheikh Saud bin Ibrahim Al-Shouraim, has asked Muslims to cooperate because Allah encourages and blesses unity, stressing the importance of working together to develop human societies.

Al-Shouraim said in a Friday sermon that no matter how much people and societies developed scientifically and materially, they would not achieve any goals without ethics. “When incitement afflicts any society, it will certainly divide its people, and when it enters any family, it will destroy it and turn friendship into hostility.”

He said that incitement was a satanic feature which led to corruption, and that an agitator is an evil person who envies others and seeks to corrupt good values.

He also said that Islam forbids incitement and makes it equal to treason, adding that Islam encourages collaboration and cooperation and forbids all types of incitement, including the incitement between husband and wife, different individuals and different groups in society. 

He said that listeners should not trust everything they hear before they corroborate its validity, stressing that there is no safety for the individual and the group unless they stay away from incitement and prevent it before it causes real damage.

In Madinah, the imam of the Prophet’s Mosque, Sheikh Abdullah Al-Buaijan, said the virtues of fasting some days of the month of Shaban, which is considered a good season for worship. He also noted that the month of Shaban helped Muslims to prepare for the month of Ramadan, adding that fasting is one of the best kinds of worship.


Sandstorms cause major health problems, expert warns

A choking cloud of sand covers the Saudi capital. (AP)
Updated 24 min 47 sec ago
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Sandstorms cause major health problems, expert warns

  • People should take adequate precautions during sandstorms in Saudi Arabia, says scientist
  • Dr. Sultan Ayoub Meo: The diseases of the respiratory system induced by air pollutants are influenced by the type of dust and duration of exposure to the particles

JEDDAH: An eminent scientist has advised people to take adequate precautions during sandstorms in Saudi Arabia, which can cause a number of health problems, including respiratory complications.

Dr. Sultan Ayoub Meo, professor at the College of Medicine at King Saud University, Riyadh, said that sandstorms are the main cause of bacterial and viral infections, especially among elderly people.

Meo, referring to a series of sandstorms that hit various regions of the Kingdom in the past six weeks, said that “a large number of people, exposed to sandstorms, have complaints of allergic rhinitis, runny nose, wheeze, cough, chest tightness, acute asthmatic attack, eye irritation, redness of the eyes, headache, sleep disturbance and psychological disturbances.”

These are in addition to the respiratory symptoms more common in children and elderly people, he said.

“The most vulnerable part of the body to sandstorms is the respiratory system,” Meo said. “People who are exposed to them are more vulnerable to the air pollutants, as the dust particles enter the respiratory system and cause various health problems.” 

The diseases of the respiratory system induced by air pollutants are influenced by the type of dust and duration of exposure to the particles, he said.

He pointed out that the environmental protection agencies must make use of the print and electronic media to provide information about the exact date and time of sandstorms to minimize unnecessary exposure.

 He advised people to wear masks, which are designed to filter out small particulates, and also airtight goggles to protect the eyes. 

He also suggested that in the desert areas, people might “cultivate the land and adopt a fallow system” as the cultivation and fallow system minimizes the frequency of sandstorms. 

Meo said that the choking dust in sandstorms contains “a large number of bacteria, fungi and viruses.”