Lebanese Red Cross worker killed in south Yemen shooting

A picture taken on April 21, 2018, shows a Yemeni man looking at a Red Cross vehicle that was carrying Red Cross employee Hanna Lahoud. (AFP)
Updated 21 April 2018
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Lebanese Red Cross worker killed in south Yemen shooting

  • The aid worker died in hospital of his wounds, while colleagues in the same car were unharmed.
  • Most of Taiz is controlled by forces loyal to President Abedrabbo Mansour Hadi, while the Houthi militia still hold many parts of the surrounding area.

Sanaa: A Lebanese Red Cross employee was gunned down in his car in war-torn Yemen's southern city of Taez on Saturday, the ICRC announced.
"I'm shocked, outraged and profoundly saddened by the killing of my colleague and friend Hanna Lahoud," tweeted Robert Mardini, Middle East director for the International Committee of the Red Cross.
"We @ICRC condemn this senseless act in the strongest possible terms," he wrote. "My thoughts go out to Hanna's wife and family in #Lebanon."
The ICRC said Lahoud, who was charge of prisoners' affairs in Yemen, was on his way to visit a prison when his car came under attack by unknown gunmen.
He died in hospital of his wounds, while colleagues in the same car were unharmed, it said in a statement.
The aid worker was killed by multiple gunshots to the heart, according to a hospital source who spoke on condition of anonymity.
The back window of the car was completely shattered in the attack in the Zabab district of Taez, said an AFP photographer at the scene.
Most of Taez is controlled by forces loyal to President Abedrabbo Mansour Hadi, while Houthi rebels hold many parts of the surrounding area.
A colleague of Lahoud's mourned his death on Twitter:

"He saved hundreds of lives as a volunteer for the Lebanese Red Cross. He made silly jokes. He had a wonderful voice... He also beat cancer 2 years ago. Today an idiot took his life," tweeted ICRC regional spokeswoman Marie Claire Feghali.
The United Nations says the conflict in Yemen has triggered the world's worst humanitarian crisis, with over 22 million people dependent on aid and 8.4 million on the verge of famine.


Egypt says plane hijacker extradited from Cyprus

Updated 21 min 1 sec ago
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Egypt says plane hijacker extradited from Cyprus

  • Police said Seif Eddin Mustafa, escorted by Egyptian authorities, boarded an EgyptAir flight to Cairo on Saturday evening
  • Seif Eddin Mustafa hijacked the EgyptAir flight in March 2016 using a fake suicide belt and diverted it to the Mediterranean island of Cyprus

NICOSIA, Cyprus: An Egyptian man who hijacked a domestic EgyptAir flight in 2016 and ordered it to land in Cyprus to allegedly protest Egypt’s military-backed government has been extradited to his homeland after giving up a drawn-out legal fight, authorities said Sunday.
Police said Seif Eddin Mustafa, escorted by Egyptian authorities, boarded an EgyptAir flight to Cairo on Saturday evening.
Cyprus Justice Minister Ionas Nicolaou told The Associated Press that Mustafa’s extradition went ahead after he dropped a three-year court battle to avoid extradition.
Doros Polycarpou, with the migrant support group KISA that assisted Mustafa, told the AP that the 62-year-old decided of his own accord to return to Egypt and face prosecution there, despite fears that he may be tortured.
Polycarpou said Mustafa told his legal team he was willing “to take the risk” of suffering maltreatment at the hands of Egyptian authorities because he could “no longer take” his holding conditions in Cyprus’ prison complex.
He said Mustafa had complained that he was being held in “isolation” and put under “psychological strain” because authorities kept him away from the prison’s general population.
Mustafa’s change-of-heart stands in stark contrast to his vociferous fight against extradition to Egypt on the grounds that he could face torture or an unfair trial there.
Last year, the European Court of Human Rights blocked Cyprus from extraditing Mustafa until it could rule on whether doing so would violate its prohibition about returning individuals to countries where they may face torture or inhuman treatment.
Mustafa hijacked the EgyptAir flight in March 2016 using a fake suicide belt and diverted it to the Mediterranean island of Cyprus. A six-hour standoff with Cypriot authorities on the tarmac of Cyprus’ Larnaca airport ended peacefully after all 72 passengers and crew were released and Mustafa was arrested.
Mustafa told a Cypriot court that he meant no harm to anyone. He said he was trying to expose what he called the “fascist regime” of Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah El-Sisi and to help secure the release of 63 female dissidents being held in Egyptian prisons.
But prosecutors said Mustafa admitted in a written statement to police that he only carried out the hijacking in order to reunite with his Cypriot family.