World’s oldest person dies in Japan at age of 117

In this still image from a YouTube video, Nabi Tajima, is shown sleeping on a wheelchair. The world’s oldest person has died in southern Japan on Sunday. (YouTube)
Updated 22 April 2018
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World’s oldest person dies in Japan at age of 117

  • Tajima was born on Aug. 4, 1900, and had more than 160 descendants
  • Chiyo Yoshida, another Japanese woman aged 116, is now the world’s oldest person, says Gerontology Research Group

TOKYO: The world’s oldest person has died in southern Japan at the age of 117.
An official in the town of Kikai says Nabi Tajima died in a hospital on Saturday shortly before 8 p.m. She had been hospitalized since January.
Tajima was born on Aug. 4, 1900, and reportedly had more than 160 descendants, including great-great-great grandchildren. Her town of Kikai is in Kagoshima prefecture on Kyushu, the southernmost of Japan’s four main islands.
She became the world’s oldest person seven months ago after the death of Violet Brown in Jamaica, also at the age of 117.
The US-based Gerontology Research Group says that another Japanese woman, Chiyo Yoshida, is now the world’s oldest person in its records. She is 116 years old.


Amputee Sumatran tiger gives birth to cubs

Updated 22 January 2019
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Amputee Sumatran tiger gives birth to cubs

  • The gender of the two cubs is yet to be determined
  • There are less than 400 Sumartan tigers remaining in the wild as they are losing their habitats to deforestation

PADANG-LAWAS, Indonesia: A Sumatran tiger with an amputated paw has given birth to a pair of cubs in Indonesia, amid fears for the future of the critically endangered species.
Gadis — whose name means girl in Indonesian — delivered her babies at the Padang Lawas conservation area in North Sumatra about a month ago, conservationists say.
The tiger mom has been undergoing rehabilitation since her paw and part of her leg were amputated two years ago after getting caught in a trap for catching wild boars.
“Gadis... has now recovered and is healthy, giving birth to the two cubs,” said reserve head Parta Basmeli Siregar.
The sex of the two cubs has not yet been established, he added.
Sumatran tiger births are rare and the species is considered critically endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.
There are fewer than 400 left in the wild and environmental activists say they are increasingly coming into conflict with people as their natural habitat is rapidly deforested.