Daesh claims responsibility for suicide bombing that killed more than 60 would-be voters in Kabul

An Afghan man runs away as dust blows in the aftermath of a blast. (AFP)
Updated 22 April 2018
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Daesh claims responsibility for suicide bombing that killed more than 60 would-be voters in Kabul

  • The attack will not deter Afghans from voting, says Afghanistan's chief executive Abdullah Abdullah
  • The attack was the deadliest against the elections process since the launch of registration more than a week ago in Afghanistan

KABUL: Daesh claimed responsibility for a suicide attack that killed more than 60 would-be voters in the Afghan capital of Kabul on Sunday.

The attack may cause further concern among Afghans who already seem disinterested in registering for the crucial elections to select a new parliament and choose new members for provincial councils on Oct. 20.

It occurred in the Dashte Barchi part of Kabul, a Shia-dominated area where Daesh has conducted a number of deadly attacks against the Shia-populated areas in recent months.

Interior ministry officials said the bomber blew himself up outside offices used for voters’ registration where, according to the health ministry, 63 died and 119 other people were wounded.

Some schoolchildren were among the victims, hospital officials told Arab News.

Blood-stained National ID papers and voters’ photos are seen on the ground outside a voter registration center, after a suicide attack in Kabul, Sunday, April 22, 2018. (AP Photo)

Abdullah Abdullah, the country’s chief executive, in a tweet, said the attack will not deter Afghans from voting.

“I strongly condemn the terrorist attack on the voters’ registration center in Kabul. I stand with those affected by this cowardly attack. Our resolve for fair and transparent elections will continue and terrorists won’t win against the will of the Afghan people.”

Sunday’s attack was the deadliest against the elections process since the launch of registration more than a week ago in Afghanistan. Other attacks were minor and happened in remote areas.

The turnout of those registering is said to be far lower — a sign of lack of interest among Afghans because of fraudulent past elections and the way many leaders and politicians failed to deliver on even minor promises given during the campaign.


Dozens of casualties reported after Taliban attack on Afghan base

Updated 41 min 44 sec ago
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Dozens of casualties reported after Taliban attack on Afghan base

  • The attack killed as many as 44 Afghan police and soldiers, provincial officials said
  • It is the latest in a series that have killed dozens of members of the security forces in provinces across Afghanistan

KABUL: A Taliban attack on a military outpost in the northern province of Baghlan in the early hours of Wednesday killed as many as 44 Afghan police and soldiers, provincial officials said, as the insurgents kept up pressure on government forces.

There was no immediate comment from the ministry of defense but officials in the area said nine police and 35 soldiers were killed in the attack, the latest in a series that have killed dozens of members of the security forces in provinces across Afghanistan.

The attack came as the situation in the embattled central city of Ghazni eased after the Taliban said they had ordered forces out after five days of fighting that killed and wounded hundreds and left the city a burned-out wreck.

The city hospital was overcrowded with hundreds of wounded people and dozens of bodies and people desperately searching for relatives among the dead and wounded.

The International Committee of the Red Cross said it was providing dressing packages and oral and intravenous medicine to treat wounded at the provincial hospital.

The ICRC also sent fresh water and electricity generators for trauma surgeries and delivered material for the management of remains.

About 20 percent of the population in Ghazni depend on the city water system, which has been down since the beginning of fighting. The ICRC is organizing emergency water supplies by truck to cover the needs of about 18,000 people.

“Some people had managed to flee the city but there were many others trapped in their houses,” said one Taliban commander, who said the decision to pull out was made to prevent further destruction in the city.

“They were facing severe shortage of food and drinking water as the power supply was also suspended to the city two days ago,” the Taliban commander, who declined to be identified, said by telephone.