Hawaii shark bite victim previously attacked by bear, snake

Dylan McWilliams, 20, had previously survived attacks by a bear and a rattlesnake before the shark bit him (Shutterstock)
Updated 22 April 2018
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Hawaii shark bite victim previously attacked by bear, snake

  • Dylan McWilliams, 20, is either the luckiest or unluckiest man alive, depending on how you look at this
  • The bear dragged him in its teeth by the back of his head

WASHINGTON: It was third time unlucky for a Colorado man attacked by a shark in Hawaii — as he had already been mauled by a bear and bitten by a rattlesnake, all in less than four years, local media reported.
Dylan McWilliams, 20, was bodyboarding in the ocean off Kauai on Thursday, when what he believed to be a tiger shark between six and eight feet (around two meters) long chomped him on the leg, the Honolulu Star Advertiser reported.
The outdoorsman — who said he has worked as a survival training instructor — was able to swim around 30 yards (meters) back to shore, where a bystander called paramedics.
“I didn’t know if I lost half my leg or what,” he said.
McWilliams, of Grand Junction, western Colorado, received seven stitches in hospital — just months after he was given nine staples in his scalp following an altercation with a black bear at a Colorado summer camp last July.
As he slept outdoors, McWilliams said he was awoken by the bear biting the back of his head. It then dragged him, only dropping its grip as he punched it and poked it in the eye.
“I guess I was just in the wrong spot at the wrong time,” he said of the attack, which caught the attention of media outlets worldwide.
The two attacks followed his first run-in with a rattlesnake during a Utah hiking trip. However, he told the Star Advertiser, the bite was not severe, and he was only ill for a couple of days.
“My parents are grateful I’m still alive,” he added.


’Lava bomb’ from Hawaii volcano injures 23 on boat

Updated 17 July 2018
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’Lava bomb’ from Hawaii volcano injures 23 on boat

  • Kilauea is one of the world’s most active volcanos and one of five on the island
  • The eruption has destroyed hundreds of homes since it began on May 3

LOS ANGELES: A projectile from the Kilauea volcano in Hawaii struck a boat carrying people watching lava from the two-month-old eruption, injuring 23, the fire department said.
Thirteen of them required hospitalization and the rest were treated at a harbor when the boat engaged in a “lava tour” returned to the Big Island, also known as Hawaii.
Lava flowing into the Pacific is a spectacular sight, producing a foggy haze known in Hawaii as “laze.”
One woman was in serious condition with a fractured femur.
The total number of people on the boat was not immediately known, the Hawaii County Fire Department said.
In the early morning incident a “lava bomb” punctured the roof of the boat and damaged a railing, the department said. It gave no further details.
“It was an explosion, basically,” said Janet Snyder, a spokeswoman for the county mayor, told the Tribune Herald newspaper. “It punctured a hole right through the roof of the boat.”
She described the boat as “covered with lava.”
The eruption has destroyed hundreds of homes since it began on May 3.
Kilauea is one of the world’s most active volcanos and one of five on the island.
One of the most active fissures, number 8, continues to erupt and its lava has formed a small “island” a few meters from the coast, according to the United States Geological Survey (USGS).
It is very likely that it is part of the flow of fissure 8 that is entering the ocean, the USGS says.
Lava has engulfed an area of about eight square miles (20 square kilometers) since the volcano began erupting.
Scientists believe that volcanic activity can be a precursor to a major eruption, similar to a Kilauea eruption in the mid-1920s.