Kuwait says overnight fire at onshore oil rig now contained

Kuwait’s state-run oil company says it has contained a fire at an onshore oil rig in the country’s southwestern oilfields. (Shutterstock)
Updated 23 April 2018
0

Kuwait says overnight fire at onshore oil rig now contained

  • Kuwait’s state-run oil company says it has contained a fire at an onshore oil rig in the country’s southwestern oilfields
  • The company acknowledged another spill at the field earlier this month, without elaborating

KUWAIT CITY: Kuwait’s state-run oil company says it has contained a fire at an onshore oil rig in the country’s southwestern oilfields.
The Kuwait Oil Co. said early on Monday that a fire broke out while an emergency team responded to what it described as a “minor” leak at the Al-Maqwa field.
The company said the fire caused no injuries and production continued at the field. It did not offer an estimate for the number of barrels of oil spilled in the leak.
The company acknowledged another spill at the field earlier this month, without elaborating.
OPEC member Kuwait, a tiny emirate on the Arabian Gulf, is a major oil producer. Kuwait produces some 2.9 million barrels of crude oil a day and holds the world’s sixth-largest oil reserves.


China files WTO challenge to US tariffs on solar panels

Updated 5 min 39 sec ago
0

China files WTO challenge to US tariffs on solar panels

  • The 30 percent tariffs announced in January improperly help US producers in violation of WTO rules, China’s commerce ministry said
  • China has tried to portray itself as a defender of the WTO-based trading system

BEIJING: China says it is challenging a US tariff hike on solar panels before the World Trade Organization, adding to its sprawling conflicts with President Donald Trump over trade and technology.
The 30 percent tariffs announced in January improperly help US producers in violation of WTO rules, the Commerce Ministry said. It said a formal complaint was filed Tuesday with the WTO in Geneva.
The solar duties are separate from tariff hikes imposed by the Trump administration starting in July on Chinese imports in response to complaints Beijing steals or pressures companies to hand over technology.
The duties also apply to imports of solar cells and modules from Europe, Canada, Mexico and South Korea. That strained relations with US allies.
The Trump administration has defended the solar tariffs as necessary to protect American producers, saying import prices were unfairly low due to subsidies and other improper support.
Washington took action under a 1974 US law instead of through the WTO. That led to complaints it was undermining the global trade body. US officials say such action is necessary because the WTO lacks the ability to address Chinese trade tactics.
China has tried to portray itself as a defender of the WTO-based trading system. It has attempted to recruit European and other governments as allies against Washington, but they echo US complaints about Chinese market barriers and industrial policy.
The European Union filed its own WTO complaint in June against Chinese technology policies it said violate Beijing’s free-trade commitments.
The US solar action “seriously damaged China’s trade interests” and “also affects the seriousness and authority of WTO rules,” said a Commerce Ministry statement.
WTO complaints begin with negotiations between parties to the dispute. If those fail, the case moves to a panel of experts who can decide whether the trade controls are improper.
In their technology dispute, Washington imposed 25 percent duties on $34 billion of Chinese goods it said benefit from improper industrial policies. Beijing responded with similar penalties.
Another round of US tariff hikes on $16 billion of Chinese goods is due to take effect Aug. 23. Beijing says it will retaliate.
Earlier, Beijing filed a separate WTO challenge on July 16 to Trump’s proposal for yet another round of increases that would add 25 percent import duties on an additional $200 billion of Chinese goods.