Yara Shahidi shines at Time Gala

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Yara Shahidi wore a quirky, cute outfit. (AFP)
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Ibtihaj Muhammad. (AFP)
Updated 25 April 2018
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Yara Shahidi shines at Time Gala

  • Actress Yara Shahidi attended the Time 100 Gala celebrating its annual list of the 100 Most Influential People in the World this week
  • The Iranian-American star of TV show “Black-ish” paired her quirky outfit with a slick top knot and black heels

DUBAI: Actress Yara Shahidi attended the Time 100 Gala celebrating its annual list of the 100 Most Influential People in the World this week, looking out of this world in a galactic-themed outfit.

The Iranian-American star of TV show “Black-ish” paired her quirky outfit with a slick top knot and black heels.

She is well-known for her stance against the proposed US immigration ban that caused uproar last year and shared a message on her social media accounts at the time saying: “If my baba was stuck in an airport because of a Muslim ban 39 years ago, he would have never fallen in love with my mama. I would not exist and I wouldn’t have two amazing brothers.”

The actress has also been vocal about her Iranian-African-American heritage and even called herself “a proud Black Iranian.”

Also at the event, held at New York’s Lincoln Center on April 24, was hijab-wearing Olympian Ibtihaj Muhammad.

Mohammed, the first American to compete at the Olympics while wearing a hijab, won a bronze medal in fencing at the 2016 Rio Games.

In 2017, she made headlines yet again when Mattel Inc. said it would release a doll modeled on the sporting star. The doll is part of the Barbie “Shero” line that honors women who break boundaries. Past dolls have included gymnast Gabby Douglas and “Selma” director Ava DuVernay.

“I had so many moments as an athlete, where I didn’t feel included, where I was often in spaces where there was a lack of representation,” Mohammed said at the time. “So to be in this moment, as a US Olympian, to have Mattel, such a global brand, diversify their toy line to include a Barbie doll that wears a hijab is very moving to me.”

Meanwhile, singer, actress and fashion icon Jennifer Lopez lent the event some glittering star power.

She graced the red carpet in a gold gown by Lebanese designer Zuhair Murad, mere days after her photoshoot with Time magazine was revealed to the world.

Lopez wears a dress by Murad on the cover of Time magazine’s May issue, in which she is named one of the 100 most influential people in the world.
The gown is from the designer’s spring 2018 couture line. Murad’s official Instagram page shared a video of the actress speaking to the magazine, along with a caption that said: “We couldn’t be happier.”
“I never let anyone pigeon-hole me or put me in a box,” Lopez said in the video. “And every step of the way people try to do that to you — especially 


Reminder: Your smartphone is likely tracking your location

Updated 21 August 2018
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Reminder: Your smartphone is likely tracking your location

  • Most apps now use location tracking, and not just for obvious purposes like maps and transport
  • A study by Yale University found that three quarters of Android apps contained trackers — usually containing advertising

PARIS: A new lawsuit accusing Google of tracking people’s locations against their will has served as a reminder that every movement of most smartphone users is being recorded, often without their knowledge.
The California man who filed the suit claims that the tech behemoth continued to track the whereabouts of Android smartphone users even after they turned off “location history.”
But the history of geolocation and the privacy issues it raises are as old as the mobile phone itself.
Before smartphones arrived more than a decade ago, it was still possible to use geolocation. Mobile phones constantly connect to local antenna towers, and by triangulating the signals the user can be found — as Jeff Goldblum illustrated in the 1996 movie “Independence Day.”
However smartphones brought about a far simpler way to track people: GPS.
After the release of the first iPhone revolutionized the industry in 2007, GPS — Global Positioning System using satellites — became prevalent, and it is now included on all smartphones.
Most apps now use location tracking, and not just for obvious purposes like maps and transport. It’s also used for dating, food delivery and gaming, such as Pokemon Go, which became hugely if briefly popular across the world in 2016.
As the popularity of apps using geolocations grows, so does their money-making potential.
For example, when tourists use their phone to explore, they can be targeted with advertising not just from the country they are in but also the city and even the street they are standing on.
A 2014 study by CNIL, the French government’s techonology consumer protection body, showed that between a quarter to a third of apps had access to the phone’s location.
By 2017, a study by Yale University found that three quarters of Android apps contained trackers — usually containing advertising.
The CNIL study also found that some apps tracked the phone’s location more than a million times over a three-month period — accessing the information about once per minute.
The new Google lawsuit is far from the first time privacy concerns have been raised over geolocation. In 2011 fellow tech giant Apple faced a lawsuit over location tracking on its ubiquitous iPhones and iPads.
And there are also national security concerns.
Last month, researchers found that the fitness app Polar had revealed sensitive data on military and intelligence personnel from 69 countries. The app later disabled the function.
Just months before another health app, Strava, was found to have showed potentially sensitive information about US and allied forces around the world.
But the problem includes apps that don’t even need to track the users’ location.
Some simple flashlight apps have been discovered to have been secretly sharing location information.