Yara Shahidi shines at Time Gala

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Yara Shahidi wore a quirky, cute outfit. (AFP)
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Ibtihaj Muhammad. (AFP)
Updated 25 April 2018
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Yara Shahidi shines at Time Gala

  • Actress Yara Shahidi attended the Time 100 Gala celebrating its annual list of the 100 Most Influential People in the World this week
  • The Iranian-American star of TV show “Black-ish” paired her quirky outfit with a slick top knot and black heels

DUBAI: Actress Yara Shahidi attended the Time 100 Gala celebrating its annual list of the 100 Most Influential People in the World this week, looking out of this world in a galactic-themed outfit.

The Iranian-American star of TV show “Black-ish” paired her quirky outfit with a slick top knot and black heels.

She is well-known for her stance against the proposed US immigration ban that caused uproar last year and shared a message on her social media accounts at the time saying: “If my baba was stuck in an airport because of a Muslim ban 39 years ago, he would have never fallen in love with my mama. I would not exist and I wouldn’t have two amazing brothers.”

The actress has also been vocal about her Iranian-African-American heritage and even called herself “a proud Black Iranian.”

Also at the event, held at New York’s Lincoln Center on April 24, was hijab-wearing Olympian Ibtihaj Muhammad.

Mohammed, the first American to compete at the Olympics while wearing a hijab, won a bronze medal in fencing at the 2016 Rio Games.

In 2017, she made headlines yet again when Mattel Inc. said it would release a doll modeled on the sporting star. The doll is part of the Barbie “Shero” line that honors women who break boundaries. Past dolls have included gymnast Gabby Douglas and “Selma” director Ava DuVernay.

“I had so many moments as an athlete, where I didn’t feel included, where I was often in spaces where there was a lack of representation,” Mohammed said at the time. “So to be in this moment, as a US Olympian, to have Mattel, such a global brand, diversify their toy line to include a Barbie doll that wears a hijab is very moving to me.”

Meanwhile, singer, actress and fashion icon Jennifer Lopez lent the event some glittering star power.

She graced the red carpet in a gold gown by Lebanese designer Zuhair Murad, mere days after her photoshoot with Time magazine was revealed to the world.

Lopez wears a dress by Murad on the cover of Time magazine’s May issue, in which she is named one of the 100 most influential people in the world.
The gown is from the designer’s spring 2018 couture line. Murad’s official Instagram page shared a video of the actress speaking to the magazine, along with a caption that said: “We couldn’t be happier.”
“I never let anyone pigeon-hole me or put me in a box,” Lopez said in the video. “And every step of the way people try to do that to you — especially 


What We Are Reading Today: American Bonds by Sarah L. Quinn

Updated 26 June 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: American Bonds by Sarah L. Quinn

  • American Bonds examines the evolution of securitization and federal credit programs

Federal housing finance policy and mortgage-backed securities have gained widespread attention in recent years because of the 2008 financial crisis, but issues of government credit have been part of American life since the nation’s founding. 

From the 1780s, when a watershed national land credit policy was established, to the postwar foundations of our current housing finance system, American Bonds examines the evolution of securitization and federal credit programs. Sarah Quinn shows that since the Westward expansion, the US government has used financial markets to manage America’s complex social divides, and politicians and officials across the political spectrum have turned to land sales, home ownership, and credit to provide economic opportunity without the appearance of market intervention or direct wealth redistribution.

Highly technical systems, securitization, and credit programs have been fundamental to how Americans determined what they could and should owe one another. 

Over time, government officials embraced credit as a political tool that allowed them to navigate an increasingly complex and fractured political system, affirming the government’s role as a consequential and creative market participant. Neither intermittent nor marginal, credit programs supported the growth of powerful industries, from railroads and farms to housing and finance; have been used for disaster relief, foreign policy, and military efforts; and were promoters of amortized mortgages, lending abroad, venture capital investment, and mortgage securitization. Illuminating America’s market-heavy social policies, American Bonds illustrates how political institutions became involved in the nation’s lending practices.