Trump, Macron ‘bromance’ draws late night laughs in US

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The “bromance” between US President Donald Trump and French leader Emmanuel Macron has provided plenty of material for America’s late night TV comedians. (AFP)
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The “bromance” between US President Donald Trump and French leader Emmanuel Macron has provided plenty of material for America’s late night TV comedians. (AFP)
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The “bromance” between US President Donald Trump and French leader Emmanuel Macron has provided plenty of material for America’s late night TV comedians. (AFP)
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The “bromance” between US President Donald Trump and French leader Emmanuel Macron has provided plenty of material for America’s late night TV comedians. (AFP)
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The “bromance” between US President Donald Trump and French leader Emmanuel Macron has provided plenty of material for America’s late night TV comedians. (AFP)
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The “bromance” between US President Donald Trump and French leader Emmanuel Macron has provided plenty of material for America’s late night TV comedians. (AFP)
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The “bromance” between US President Donald Trump and French leader Emmanuel Macron has provided plenty of material for America’s late night TV comedians. (AFP)
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The “bromance” between US President Donald Trump and French leader Emmanuel Macron has provided plenty of material for America’s late night TV comedians. (AFP)
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The “bromance” between US President Donald Trump and French leader Emmanuel Macron has provided plenty of material for America’s late night TV comedians. (AFP)
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The “bromance” between US President Donald Trump and French leader Emmanuel Macron has provided plenty of material for America’s late night TV comedians. (AFP)
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The “bromance” between US President Donald Trump and French leader Emmanuel Macron has provided plenty of material for America’s late night TV comedians. (AFP)
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The “bromance” between US President Donald Trump and French leader Emmanuel Macron has provided plenty of material for America’s late night TV comedians. (AFP)
Updated 25 April 2018
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Trump, Macron ‘bromance’ draws late night laughs in US

WASHINGTON: Firm handshakes, warm embraces, kisses, even a bit of grooming: the “bromance” between US President Donald Trump and French leader Emmanuel Macron has provided plenty of material for America’s late night TV comedians.
“Trump and Macron have an interesting relationship,” comedian Jimmy Kimmel said on his talk show on ABC.
“Trump very much needs a friend, because most of his old ones are going to prison,” Kimmel said, in a reference to the US president’s legal woes.
“And Donald Trump, really, he cannot keep his hands off this guy,” Kimmel said before showing television clips of affectionate embraces between the pair.
One exchange which has drawn particular attention took place in the Oval Office, when Trump brushed off what he said was “dandruff” on Macron’s jacket.
“We have to make him perfect,” Trump said. “He is perfect.”
For Kimmel, tongue firmly in cheek, it was a “historic moment.”
“To the best of my knowledge, it was the first time a world leader ever publicly brushed dandruff off another world leader,” Kimmel said.

Several comedians contrasted the supposedly frosty relationship between Trump and his wife, Melania, to his warm friendship with Macron.
“Compared to holding hands with Melania, he and Macron just performed the kama sutra together,” said “Late Show” host Stephen Colbert on CBS. “Which one is he married to again?“
Trevor Noah of “The Daily Show” on Comedy Central said Macron “seems to have the recipe for handling Trump.”
“You could really feel that Macron was connecting with Trump,” Noah said. “And we all know that Trump is not the sentimental type.
“But clearly Macron made Trump feel a way he’s never ever felt before — human.”
“I know it’s a cliche but that’s a bromance,” Noah said. “That’s more affection than he’s ever shown Melania.”
Noah ended the segment with a mock black-and-white silent movie with a romantic soundtrack showing the Trump-Macron interactions which he called “L’affaire des Mains” — “The Affair of the Hands.”
Comedian Seth Meyers showed footage on his “Late Night” show on NBC of the 71-year-old Trump and 40-year-old Macron sharing an interminable handshake — similar to one the pair had shared last year.
“President Trump welcomed French President Emmanuel Macron to the White House at 5:15 p.m. this evening — and they are still shaking hands,” Meyers said.


Chip Wickham ushers in winds of change on the jazz scene

Updated 22 May 2018
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Chip Wickham ushers in winds of change on the jazz scene

PARIS: The hotly hyped “British jazz invasion” has been the toast of international scenesters for some months now, with breathy adjective-heavy sprawls penned on both sides of the Atlantic paying tribute to a fresh generation of musos who grew up not in the conservatoires but the clubs, channelling the grit and groove of grime into a distinctly hip, 21st century strain of freewheeling, DIY improvised music.

Now the Arab world has its own outpost in the form of Chip Wickham, a UK-born flautist, saxophonist and producer whose second album grew out of extended stints teaching in the GCC. “Shamal Wind” takes its name from the Gulf’s primal weather patterns, and there’s a distinctly meditative, Middle Eastern vibe to the title track, a slow-burning, moody vamp, peppered with percussive trills, with hints of Yusef Lateef to be found in Wickham’s wandering woodwind musings.

There’s rather less goatee-stroking to be found across the four further up-tempo cuts, which swap soul-searching for soul-jazz, soaked in the breezy bop of a vintage Blue Note release. Recorded over a hot summer in Madrid, a heady Latin pulse drives first single, “Barrio 71” — championed by the likes of Craig Charles — with Spanish multi-percussionist David el Indio steaming up a block party beat framing Wickham’s gutsy workout on baritone sax.

Having previously worked with electronic acts, including Nightmares on Wax and Jimpster, one imagines the dancefloor was a key stimulus behind Wickham’s rhythmically dense, but harmonically spare compositional approach. Phil Wilkinson’s sheer, thumped piano chords drive the relentless nod of second single “Snake Eyes,” Wickham’s raspy flute floating somewhere overhead, readymade to be skimmed off for the anticipated remix market.

In truth, Manchester-raised Wickham is both too thoughtful, and too thoughtless, to truly belong to the London-brewed jazz invasion — Shamal Wind yo-yos between meditative meandering and soulful strutting with a wilful disrespect for trend.