Victims voice relief after arrest in serial killing case

A Sacramento County sheriff deputy stands guard in front of the home of accused rapist and killer Joseph James DeAngelo on April 24, 2018 in Citrus Heights, California. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images/AFP )
Updated 26 April 2018
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Victims voice relief after arrest in serial killing case

  • Victim describes how one morning in 1976 changed an innocent day into one of horror
  • Attacker moved her son and then struck at her - when he was finished he placed her son back on the bed next to her

SACRAMENTO, Calif: Jane Carson-Sandler’s morning in 1976 turned from innocence to terror when a masked man broke into her home and entered the bedroom where she lay snuggled with her 3-year-old son.
He confronted them with a butcher knife and shone a flashlight in her eyes before tying them up.
She said she was paralyzed by fear, afraid the man would kill them. When he untied her ankles, she knew he would rape her.
Before assaulting her, he moved her son from her side, but she doesn’t know where. After it was over, he put her son back in bed next to her.
Carson-Sandler voiced relief after police arrested Joseph James DeAngelo and identified him on Wednesday as the serial killer who committed a string of killings and rapes in the 1970s and ‘80s in California.
Carson-Sandler, now 72, wants to face her attacker in person and ask how long he had been watching her and what he did with her son during the attack.
“I just wonder when he first saw me, how long he had been stalking me,” said Carson-Sandler, who was in the Air Force reserves and studying to be a nurse at the time of the attack.
Carson-Sandler was one of dozens of women raped by a man dubbed the East Area Rapist and the Golden State Killer, who police say killed at least 12 people and raped at least 45 in the 1970s and 1980s.
She was attacked in her home in the Sacramento suburb of Citrus Heights.
She and Bruce Harrington, whose brother and sister-in-law were killed in 1980 in Orange County, said DeAngelo’s arrest will launch a healing process for victims that has been delayed for decades.
“It is time for the victims to begin to heal,” Harrington said at a news conference in Sacramento.
A DNA match led authorities to arrest DeAngelo in connection with four killings in Sacramento and Ventura counties, officials said.
“I feel like I’m in the middle of a dream and I’m going to wake up and it’s not going to be true,” Carson-Sandler said in an interview with The Associated Press. “It’s just so nice to have closure and to know he’s in jail.”
Carson-Sandler, now living near Hilton Head Island, South Carolina, said she didn’t know DeAngelo or recognize his name.
She wrote a book about her experience called “Frozen in Fear.” She has spoken with rapists in prison about how the attack affected her. She tells them to close their eyes and imagine she is their mother or sister or lover while she tells her story.
She says she hopes to make them understand the trauma they have caused so they won’t hurt more people.
Harrington’s brother, 24-year-old Keith Harrington and his wife, 27-year-old Patrice Harrington, were beaten to death in their home, Orange County District Attorney Tony Rackauckas said.
Bruce Harrington applauded law enforcement’s pursuit of justice for them. DeAngelo’s arrest, he said, will “bring closure to the anguish that we all suffered for the last 40-odd years.”

Former policeman arrested accused of at least 12 murders and 50 rapes


Extreme Easter: Flogging, crucifixions in Philippines

Updated 19 April 2019
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Extreme Easter: Flogging, crucifixions in Philippines

  • Nearly 80 percent of people in the Philippines are Catholic
  • Catholicism is a legacy of the nation’s 300 years of Spanish colonial rule that ended at the turn of the 20th century

SAN FERNANDO, Philippines: Hundreds of barefoot men beat themselves with flails and at least 10 were to be nailed onto crosses throughout Good Friday in a blood-soaked display of religious fervor in the Philippines.
Frowned upon by the Church, the ritual crucifixions and self-flagellation are extreme affirmations of faith peformed every Easter in Asia’s Catholic outpost.
Barefoot men wearing crowns of twigs walked silently on the side of a village road in the scorching tropical heat of the northern Philippines, flogging their backs with bamboo strips tied to a length of rope.
While many of the 80 million Filipino Catholics spend Good Friday at church or with family, others go to these extreme lengths to atone for sins or seek divine intervention in a spectacle that has become a major tourist attraction.
“This is a religious vow. I will do this every year for as long as I am able,” 38-year-old truck driver Resty David, who has been self-flagellating for half his life at his village in the northern Philippines, told AFP.
He said he also hoped it would convince God to cure his cancer-stricken brother.
Blood and sweat soaked through the penitents’ pants with some spectators grimacing with each strike of the lash.
Some hid behind their companions to avoid the splatter of gore and ripped flesh.
Many in the crowds had driven for hours to witness the frenzied climax of the day’s gory spectacle, when believers allow themselves to be nailed to crosses in a re-enactment the crucifixion of Jesus Christ.
“I’m a little bit overwhelmed. It’s very intense, I haven’t expected something like this,” German tourist Annika Ehlers, 24, told AFP.
Ehlers said she had witnessed the first of 10 scheduled crucifixions during the day in villages around the city of San Fernando, about 70 kilometers (40) miles) north of Manila.
Eight centimeter (three-inch) spikes are driven through both the man’s hands and feet before the wooden cross is raised briefly for the crowds to see. After that the nails are pulled out and he is given medical treatment.
The Church says the faithful should spend Lent in quiet prayer and reflection.
“The crucifixion and death of Jesus are more than enough to redeem humanity from the effects of sins. They are once in a lifetime events that need not be repeated,” Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines official Father Jerome Secillano said.
“Holy Week.... is not the time to showcase man’s propensity for entertainment and Pharisaical tendencies,” he added.
Nearly 80 percent of people in the Philippines are Catholic, a legacy of the nation’s 300 years of Spanish colonial rule that ended at the turn of the 20th century.