Muse: Nour Hage talks self-expression and serial killers

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Updated 26 April 2018
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Muse: Nour Hage talks self-expression and serial killers

  • The UK-based Lebanese fashion designer talks boredom, self-expression and serial killers

 

My parents are definitely the biggest influence on my personality and philosophy. We were always careful with waste, for environmental and financial reasons. One of the things that I’m thankful for is that they never let us spend money on meaningless things. From very young, I was aware of the value of money and the value of everything I use. That’s why my brand always has a sustainable side to it. I always try to inflict less harm on the environment.

I always admire people that go against the stream and stand for what they are doing, whether that is professionally or personally.

I think the most fundamental difference between men and women (I’m generalizing here) is that women tend to be very careful with their decision making and think things through, while men tend to go with their first instincts; much more daring but also much more risky. I think the perfect balance is to have those two facets in a relationship and in a professional situation.

There’s this perception that some people are so fundamentally different that it’s impossible to solve our differences. I think that’s lazy. Everything is solvable.

Some people think this is a bit worrying, but I love reading about serial killers. I have this big obsession. It’s curiosity; I want to know the why, the how, and the why of the how.

What people wear is how they want others to perceive them; they’re trying to put a message out there. Even if it’s just a t-shirt and jeans, you’re still saying you’re someone who likes to keep things simple. So for me the ultimate form of expression is designing clothes. It just feels very rewarding. There’s this indescribable feeling when I look at my completed collection for the first time.

The school I went to was one of the most boring and strict schools in Lebanon. Everybody dressed the same. I wanted to stand out, wanted to look different. I started to wear these strange DIY outfits I’d cobble together. I was so bored on a daily basis, both visually and mentally, that I felt the need to start experimenting. So I guess you could say that boredom was my major inspiration to start designing. More people should allow themselves to get bored these days.


Jazz Pharma’s sleep disorder treatment gets US FDA nod

Updated 21 March 2019
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Jazz Pharma’s sleep disorder treatment gets US FDA nod

  • The drug, solriamfetol, will treat excessive sleepiness in adult patients with narcolepsy or obstructive sleep apnea
  • The patent of Jazz's narcolepsy drug, Xyrem, were declared invalid by a US appeals court in July
The US Food and Drug Administration approved Jazz Pharmaceuticals Plc’s treatment for patients with a form of sleep disorder, the company said on Wednesday.
The drug, solriamfetol, will treat excessive sleepiness in adult patients with narcolepsy or obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).
Solriamfetol is expected to be commercially available in the United States following the final scheduling decision by the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Jazz said in a statement.
The approval comes as Jazz is trying to reduce its reliance on its blockbuster narcolepsy drug, Xyrem, whose patents were declared invalid by a US appeals court in July.
Xyrem is an approved treatment for excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy in patients with narcolepsy. It brought in sales of $1.4 billion in 2018 and accounted for about 70 percent of company’s revenue.
“Jazz is trying to reduce its reliance on Xyrem, and solriamfetol will be one of the drugs it plans to launch to do that,” Mizuho Securities USA analyst Irina Koffler said ahead of the agency’s decision.
“Solriamfetol is expected to be an important driver of both diversification and growth,” RBC Capital Markets analyst Randall Stanicky said in a note ahead of the approval.
Solriamfetol is expected to bring in revenue of $314 million by 2024, Stanicky said.
Narcolepsy is a chronic sleep disorder with overwhelming daytime drowsiness and sudden attacks of sleep, while obstructive sleep apnea is a potentially serious sleep disorder that can cause breathing to repeatedly stop and start.
“Narcolepsy is very disabling to people as they often get diagnosed young and stop their education and drop out of high school or college,” Koffler said.
“Sleep apnea is a different problem in the sense that a lot of people don’t know they have it, have trouble breathing at night and they even fall asleep during the day.”