Tadawul has contingency plans to handle full Saudi Aramco IPO

Khalid Al-Hussan, CEO of the Saudi Stock Exchange (Tadawul), is ready for the Saudi Aramco IPO in whatever shape it comes. (Reuters)
Updated 02 May 2018

Tadawul has contingency plans to handle full Saudi Aramco IPO

  • Tadawul has capacity to handle entire listing
  • Stock exchange has central counter-party clearing house

RIYADH: The Riyadh stock exchange has a range of options for a possible listing of shares in Saudi Aramco later this year, the chief executive of Tadawul told Arab News.

Khalid Al-Hussan said that the exchange was ready to list all the shares in a potential initial public offering of 5 percent of Aramco shares, which could be worth $100 billion at current official estimates.

Speaking on the sidelines of the Euromoney conference in Riyadh, he said: “The Saudi economy has the capacity to take care of the whole IPO. There is untapped capacity outside the exchange if we need that, from corporates, individuals and foreign investors.”

Some experts have cast doubt on the Tadawul’s ability to digest such a big share offering as Aramco, which would account for nearly 20 percent of its market capitalization of around $530 billion.

They have argued that other stock markets, like New York or London, would have to be involved in the IPO, or that some shares could be sold to private investors.

Al-Hussan’s comments will add to increasing speculation that the government is leaning toward a Saudi listing before the end of this year.

He insisted that the exchange was ready and able to undertake the full listing, if asked, though he allowed that the final decision was up to the government, which would issue the shares.

“It has been determined clearly that the Tadawul is the home exchange, but the issuer will make the decision on whether it is the only exchange. What we have done is to prepare a case for each scenario, so that whenever we get the full detail on the IPO, we will have done our preparation. We have looked at all the contingencies for each scenario.”

However, he made clear that his preference was to undertake the IPO exclusively on Tadawul. “I aspire to have the whole IPO on Tadawul. But of course I’m looking at it from an exchange point of view, whereas the owner is looking at it from a national point of view,” he said.

Al-Hussan said that all the necessary regulatory, technological, operational and human preparation had been done to allow a full Aramco IPO. “We are all ready to welcome such a unique national IPO as Aramco onto the Tadawul,” he said.

“If the world comes to Aramco (via an exclusive listing on Tadawul), we are open to that and our market is accessible. If Aramco goes to the world (by listing on another market in addition to Aramco) we welcome that too, and we are ready to compete with the global exchanges,” he said.

Tadawul — the biggest and most liquid exchange in the Gulf — has been talking to other regional exchanges about the possibility of dual listings ahead of what is expected to be a rush of IPOs as the Saudi privatization program gets underway. Al-Hussan said this process was ongoing.

“We have to focus on bringing more IPOs to market, we have to persuade corporates of the benefits of going public. We are telling them to start the process of due diligence now in preparation. When you pull the trigger to go public, that is your decision, but you have to be ready,” he said.

Tadawul also announced that it has set up a central counter-party clearing house in order to diversify investment opportunities and bring in new asset classes such as derivatives.

“This will enable Saudi companies to hedge against risks, which will enhance the attractiveness of the Saudi capital market to all investors. It will improve risk management of the market buy introducing new mechanisms to ensure that the settlement is compete and that all parties meet their obligations when settling trades in the market.

The new clearing house has been set up in the from of a closed joint stock company with SR600 million ($159.9 million) of capital. Equity settlement is expected to start in the second half of next year, with derivative settlement a year later.

FASTFACTS

Factoid

A 5 percent listing of Saudi Aramco stock could be worth as much as $100 billion


Electric luxury vehicles, SUVs ‘more likely to cause accidents’

Updated 23 August 2019

Electric luxury vehicles, SUVs ‘more likely to cause accidents’

  • As EV sales rise, French insurer AXA warns that drivers are struggling to adapt to cars’ rapid acceleration

LONDON: Electric luxury cars and sport utility vehicles (SUVs) may be 40 percent more likely to cause accidents than their standard engine counterparts, possibly because drivers are still getting used to their quick acceleration, French insurer AXA said.

The numbers, based on initial trends from claims data and not statistically significant, also suggest small and micro electric cars are slightly less likely to cause accidents than their combustion engine counterparts, AXA said at a crash test demonstration on Thursday.

AXA regularly carries out crash tests for vehicles. This year’s tests, which took place at a disused airport, focused on electric cars.

Overall accident rates for electric vehicles are about the same as for regular cars, according to liability insurance claims data for “7,000 year risks” — on 1,000 autos on the road for seven years — said Bettina Zahnd, head of accident research and prevention at AXA Switzerland.

“We saw that in the micro and small-car classes slightly fewer accidents are caused by electric autos. If you look at the luxury and SUV classes, however, we see 40 percent more accidents with electric vehicles,” Zahnd said.

“We, of course, have thought about what causes this and acceleration is certainly a topic.”

Electric cars accelerate not only quickly, but also equally strongly no matter how high the revolutions per minute, which means drivers can find themselves going faster than they intended.

FASTFACT

Accident rates among luxury and SUV electric vehicles are 40 percent higher than for their combustion engine counterparts.

Half of electric car drivers in a survey this year by AXA had to adjust their driving to reflect the new acceleration and braking characteristics.

“Maximum acceleration is available immediately, while it takes a moment for internal combustion engines with even strong horsepower to reach maximum acceleration. That places new demands on drivers,” Zahnd said.

Sales of electric cars are on the rise as charging infrastructure improves and prices come down.

Electric vehicles accounted for less than 1 percent of cars on the road in Switzerland and Germany last year, but made up 1.8 percent of Swiss new car sales, or 6.6 percent including hybrids, AXA said.

Accidents with electric cars are just about as dangerous for people inside as with standard vehicles, AXA said. The cars are subject to the same tests and have the same passive safety features such as airbags and seatbelts.

But another AXA survey showed most people do not know how to react if they come across an electric vehicle crash scene.

While most factors are the same — securing the scene, alerting rescue teams and providing first aid — it said helpers should also try to ensure the electric motor is turned off. This is particularly important because unlike an internal combustion engine the motor makes no noise. In serious crashes, electric autos’ high-voltage power plants automatically shut down, AXA noted, but damaged batteries can catch fire up to 48 hours after a crash, making it more difficult to deal with the aftermath of
an accident.

For one head-on crash test on Thursday, AXA teams removed an electric car’s batteries to reduce the risk of them catching fire, which could create intense heat and toxic fumes.

Zahnd said that studies in Europe had not replicated US findings that silent electric vehicles are as much as two-thirds more likely to cause accidents with pedestrians or cyclists.

She said the jury was still out on how crash data would affect the cost of insuring electric versus standard vehicles, noting this always reflected factors around both driver and car.

“If I look around Switzerland, there are lots of insurers that even give discounts for electric autos because one would like to promote electric cars,” she said.