What We Are Reading Today: Stephen King’s 11/22/63  

Updated 04 May 2018
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What We Are Reading Today: Stephen King’s 11/22/63  

  • Stephen King decides to right one of history’s most monumental wrongs in this morose melange of science-fiction, philosophy and romance
  • King’s painstaking research is evident throughout; his attention to detail a joy to discover on page after page

As a concept, going back in time to correct past mistakes has always been an appealing one.

And in this morose melange of science-fiction, philosophy and romance, Stephen King decides to right one of history’s most monumental wrongs.

11/22/63 throws a humble New England schoolteacher into middle-class America in the 1960s, tasked with preventing the assassination of John F. Kennedy.

No small feat. King’s painstaking research is evident throughout; his attention to detail a joy to discover on page after page.

His character development is strong, as always, and the love story interwoven into the far-fetched, fantastical time paradoxes means there is something for everyone in this rather bleak commentary on humanity’s uncanny ability to make the same mistakes over and over again.

Is it King’s best novel? Not by any stretch. But the atmosphere he creates is a stark departure from some of the better-known titles in his considerable canon.

Fans of alternative histories will love this book.

And for the rest of us, there is a lot to enjoy in the vivid world, flawed-yet-very-believable characters and the assessment on the darker side of human nature that King has written.


What We Are Reading Today: Once More We Saw Stars by Jayson Greene

Updated 19 May 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: Once More We Saw Stars by Jayson Greene

A beautiful, devastating eloquent memoir about what is it like to lose a child and continue living, says a review published on goodreads.com.

It is a journey of grief and hope and resilience, and one I will not easily forget. 

An incredibly sad memoir written by a father whose daughter’s life is cut short by a freak accident. Shortly after her second birthday, Greta Greene is struck in the head by a crumbling brick. 

Author Jayson Greene chronicles the aftermath of her death, narrating his stages of grief and quest for some sense of relief from the emotions threatening to overwhelm him.

Because neither Jayson nor his wife are religious people they seek a variety of sources in an attempt to assign some meaning out to their tragic loss. Throughout the book, Greene describes their journey and the legacy Greta’s short life has had on her grieving family.

After all, it is hard to find a more depressing topic than the death of a toddler. But, it really is worth a read. The language is luminous and captivating. The author is gifted at describing the grief and different emotional states experienced by bereaved parents.