One scientist’s 30-year quest to get under Mars’ skin

French Principal Investigator SEIS experiment on NASA InSight Mission, Philippe Lognonne, during a photo session on April 27, 2018 at the Institut de Physique du Globe (Institute of Earth Physics) at the University Paris Diderot in Paris. (AFP / STEPHANE DE SAKUTIN)
Updated 06 May 2018
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One scientist’s 30-year quest to get under Mars’ skin

  • Philippe Lognonne has explored the dynamics of tsunamis and deciphered data from 1970s Apollo missions
  • The SEIS seismometer that will leave Earth on Saturday measures ground motions in a wide range of frequencies, using an array of six sensors.

PARIS: Philippe Lognonne has waited three decades to hear the heartbeat of Mars.
With a little luck and some help from NASA, the instrument he designed to take the Red Planet’s pulse will land before the year’s end and press a high-tech ear to its dusty surface.
As principal investigator for the Seismic Experiment for Interior Structure (SEIS), a multi-sensor seismometer, Lognonne will have a front-row seat for the scheduled launch on Saturday from Vandenberg Air Force Base in central California of NASA’s InSight mission.
But he’s keeping the champagne corked: three times in the past, Mars space missions featuring his ultra-sensitive seismometers have faltered, failed or been scrapped.
Lognonne’s cherubic features are framed by a mop of shoulder-length auburn hair, a grizzled beard and white sideburns.
He has just turned 55, and has a weakness for Hawaiian shirts.
A researcher at the Institute of Earth Physics in Paris, Lognonne has explored the dynamics of tsunamis and deciphered data from 1970s Apollo missions.
But from the start, his true passion and unwavering mission was to build the tools that could detect what’s going on under Mars’ red surface.
“This planet was habitable four billion years ago, and I want to understand why, bit by bit, it stopped being so,” Lognonne said in an interview at the Paris university where he teaches.
Soon after completing his PhD in 1989, the young scientist focused on designing a suite of seismometers — used on Earth to detect and measure earthquakes — that could probe deep beneath the Martian surface in search of answers.
His first crack at securing passage to Mars for his instruments came in 1996, when France’s National Center for Space Studies joined a Russian mission that included an orbiter and two landers.
But two small seismometers on board never made it past Earth’s atmosphere — the launch failed, and the mission was aborted.
Lognonne got another shot at his goal seven years later.
Working with US engineer Bruce Banerdt — who 15 years later would become the scientific director for InSight — he helped prepare instruments for the European NetLander mission, which sought to set up a network of four small stations on the surface of Mars, including a seismometer. A launch date was set for 2005.
But the mission got mired in red ink and was axed in 2003.
“That was a bit of let-down,” Lognonne said flatly.
What kept him going? Why didn’t he give up at that point?
“I’ve always told my students, if you really believe that a project is scientifically important, the only reason to not carry on is if someone else is already doing it,” he said.
Banerdt and Lognonne went their separate ways but stayed in touch, linked in part by the dream of putting a seismometer on Mars.
“We knew that the scientific consensus was that it must be done,” Lognonne said.
In 2012, NASA invited bids under its Discovery program for relatively low-budget space exploration projects, and the duo decided to try once again.
They were up against 26 other projects in their category.
In August of that year, they got the call from NASA saying they had been selected for a 2016 Mars launch.
“Four years is very short!” Lognonne recalls thinking, as they threw themselves into the task.
The SEIS seismometer that will — with any luck at all — leave Earth on Saturday measures ground motions in a wide range of frequencies, using an array of six sensors.
It will detect and record “marsquakes” and other sources of ground motion, such as meteorite impacts and the faint gravitational effects of Phobos, a Martian moon.
The sensors are in a temperature-controlled and vacuum-sealed box housed within a domed, three-legged pod that resembles an autonomous vacuum cleaner.
The ensemble — protected by a wind and thermal shield — is to be placed on Martian soil by a robot arm, and is connected to the lander by a flexible tether with power and data lines.
But three months before the scheduled launch in early 2016, the French team detected a tiny leak in the tether.
NASA canned the launch. “That was a shock,” said Lognonne.
But this time the cancelation was not final. The mission was rescheduled for May to June 2018, the next window of opportunity for a Mars launch.
 


King Abdul Aziz City for Science and Technology unveils self-guided Black Shark boat at 38th GITEX Technology Week

The development of the Black Shark smart boat is part of a KACST initiative to localize and transform transport technology and logistics, to help achieve the aims of Vision 2030. (SPA)
Updated 20 October 2018
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King Abdul Aziz City for Science and Technology unveils self-guided Black Shark boat at 38th GITEX Technology Week

  • These trucks are equipped with electronic pairing technologies, which effectively improve the shipping and distributing of goods, reduce human error

JEDDAH: King Abdul Aziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) has unveiled its Black Shark self-guided boat at the 38th GITEX Technology Week in Dubai. The vessel, which can carry out coastal surveillance and many other tasks, was developed in collaboration with Taqnia for Robotics and Smart Systems.
The development of the craft is part of a KACST initiative to localize and transform transport technology and logistics, to help achieve the aims of Vision of 2030.
The boat includes sensor systems that allow it to monitor and create a 3D map of a 200-meter area surrounding the boat, and automated control technology that gives it the ability to navigate independently and avoid collisions without human input. It can also be equipped with a flexible range of weapons, acting as a firearms platform that uses gyroscopic self-balancing technology. It has the ability to survey beaches at a range of 15 kilometers, in addition to accurately identifying its precise location with a margin of error of less than 20 centimeters using differential GPS, as well as specifying, monitoring and tracking targets.
The Black Shark also has long-range radar that covers up to 150 kilometers, and a telecommunication system to track its location, monitor its status and connect to multiple domains through command centers that allow wireless communication and remote control. It is fitted with a digital camera powered by electro-optic and infrared technology that can produce HD-quality video, and also has night vision capability.
As part of its initiative to develop transport technology and logistics, KACST has also worked on automated control technology, included self-driving heavy-duty trucks, with the University of California, Berkeley. These trucks are equipped with electronic pairing technologies, which effectively improve the shipping and distributing of goods, reduce human error, preserve resources, and reduce harmful emissions and fuel consumption.
The same technology can also, for example, transform a four-wheel-drive vehicle into a remote-controlled vehicle equipped with video cameras, infrared technology, a microphone and a control device wirelessly connected to a command center, where an operator can guide it using images from the video cameras.