Egypt’s last surviving 1952 revolutionary leaders dies

Khaled Mohieddin was 95. (Reuters)
Updated 06 May 2018
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Egypt’s last surviving 1952 revolutionary leaders dies

  • He was one of the military leaders of the Free Officers Movement, led by Egypt’s Arab nationalist leader Gamal Abdel-Nasser
  • He was imprisoned for two months in 1971 amid a crackdown by Anwar el-Sadat who became president after Nasser’s death a year earlier

CAIRO: An Egyptian leftist opposition leader, who helped overthrow the Egyptian monarchy in the 1952 revolution, has died at a Cairo hospital. Khaled Mohieddin was 95.
Mohieddin suffered age-related health problems and was taken to a military hospital several days ago. He died on Sunday.
President Abdel-Fatah El-Sisi mourned the “symbol of national political action” and offered his condolences to the family of the late leftist leader, according to a statement by the presidency.
Mohieddin was born to a wealthy family in Qalyubia province, north of Cairo, in 1922. He graduated from Egypt’s military academy in 1940. He also gained a bachelor’s degree in commerce from the Cairo University.
He was one of the military leaders of the Free Officers Movement, led by Egypt’s Arab nationalist leader Gamal Abdel-Nasser. The movement helped topple King Farouk in July 1952.
He was the last surviving member of the Revolutionary Command Council, an executive body that ran Egypt till 1956, when Nasser was elected as Egypt’s president.
He was imprisoned for two months in 1971 amid a crackdown by Anwar el-Sadat who became president after Nasser’s death a year earlier.
Mohieddin was the founder of the leftist Patriotic Progressive Unionist Party in 1976. He was a member of the Egyptian parliament from 1990 to 2005.
He was awarded the Lenin Peace Prize in 1970 and the Nile medal, Egypt’s highest honor, in 2013.


Turkey launches air strike on Iraqi Kurdistan after killing of diplomat

Updated 19 July 2019
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Turkey launches air strike on Iraqi Kurdistan after killing of diplomat

  • Turkish vice consul to Iraq’s autonomous Kurdish region was shot dead Wednesday in the local capital Irbil
  • Turkish separatist Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) is suspected to be involved in the killing

ANKARA: Turkey on Thursday launched an air attack on Iraqi Kurdistan in response to the killing of a Turkish diplomat in the region, the country’s defense minister said.
The Turkish vice consul to Iraq’s autonomous Kurdish region was shot dead Wednesday in the local capital Irbil. Police sources said two other people were also killed.
There was no claim of responsibility for the shooting, but many Iraqi experts have pointed to the probability that the Turkish separatist Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK), which Ankara considers a terrorist group, was behind the attack.
“Following the evil attack in Irbil, we have launched the most comprehensive air operation on Qandil and dealt a heavy blow to the (PKK) terror organization,” defense minister Hulusi Akar said in a statement.
Targets such as “armaments positions, lodgings, shelters and caves belonging to terrorists” were destroyed.
“Our fight against terror will continue with increasing determination until the last terrorist is neutralized and the blood of our martyrs will be avenged,” he added.
The Kurdistan Democratic Party (KDP), which now leads the regional government, enjoys good political and trade relations with Turkey.
But Turkey has been conducting a ground offensive and bombing campaign since May in the mountainous northern region to root out the PKK which has waged an insurgency against the Turkish state since 1984.
Earlier this month, the PKK announced that one of those raids killed senior PKK leader Diyar Gharib Mohammed along with two other fighters.
A spokesman for the PKK’s armed branch denied the group was involved in Wednesday’s shooting.